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I dont know who in the Pit once posted what a great browser Firefox is, but whoever it was, thanks!, lol......Ive been using Firefox about 4 months now and not a single virus or trojan yet.Just another example I guess of the great helpful people that come here.Thanks again fellow Pitstoppers :rolleyes: :beer:

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Be careful still. My son is doing some spyware research and there are already several Firefox add-ins. The more popular Firefox becomes the more FF spyware you will see.

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I dont know who in the Pit once posted what a great browser Firefox is, but whoever it was, thanks!, lol......Ive been using Firefox about 4 months now and not a single virus or trojan yet.Just another example I guess of the great helpful people that come here.Thanks again fellow Pitstoppers :rolleyes: :beer:

Well it wouldn't have been me. :P

 

Even though I have downloaded FF (and NS / Opera) I don't use it anywhere near as much as IE, only when I have to load a page with java because my IE has settings so that on default no java can run on a page.

 

Your use of FF will not save you from trojans and spyware etc, so I would still keep your eyes open to this sorta stuff. ;)

 

I have had this computer since April and never had any troubles with it (using IE, and only recently installing a firewall). :)

 

with regards

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Ive been using Firefox about 4 months now and not a single virus or trojan yet.

I think you meant spyware/adware when you said trojans and viruses.

 

Firefox is an excellent browser that, by default, doesn't support ActiveX, the single most notorious component of IE that allows spyware/adware to be loaded on a computer system.

 

I've been using Firefox for a very long time now and spyware/adware is virutally non-existent on my computer systems. As far as I know, Firefox offers no protection against viruses or trojans. For that you require antivirus software.

 

RayG

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I don't get any spyware at all, thanks to Firefox. In fact, I even removed MS AS just yesterday. I still run Ad-awareSE every other day and Spybot once-a-week, but I just don't need 'realt time' protection anymore.

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I don't get any spyware at all, thanks to Firefox. In fact, I even removed MS AS just yesterday. I still run Ad-awareSE every other day and Spybot once-a-week, but I just don't need 'realt time' protection anymore.

That is both a bold and naive assumption.

 

Even if you don't use the real-time protection, MSASB's spyware scan is meticulous and thorough, and I wouldn't throw it away for the world. :(

 

with regards

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I use FF, and I've disabled MSAS B1 from real time protection, but I have:

 

Avast, spyware blaster and WinPatrol running around the clock, plus MSAS, Spybot, ad-aware for on call need.

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That is both a bold and naive assumption.

 

 

Maybe, but after months of Ad-aware and Spybot not finding anything I've stopped using both.

 

In fact, I've locked IE down to the point where it will not connect to the net.

 

Even if you don't use the real-time protection, MSASB's spyware scan is meticulous and thorough, and I wouldn't throw it away for the world. :( 

I find it hilarious that Microsoft came out with antispyware software to remove the spyware their other software allowed on your system in the first place. ;)

 

RayG

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Maybe, but after months of Ad-aware and Spybot not finding anything I've stopped using both

I scan once a month, and for months I have not found any spyware on my computers either. Spy-bot, ad-aware and bazooka always report nothing on my comps. I credit spywareblaster, spy-bot's immunize feature, Zonealarm and Firefox for keeping my comp ad/spywarefree.

--Still sipping off of my :beer: :P --

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Maybe, but after months of Ad-aware and Spybot not finding anything I've stopped using both.

 

Ditto, neither have found anything on my system in months....and like RacerAC I credit this to using spywareblaster. But there will come a time when something sneaks past my defences, and when it does I want to be ready to kill it. ;)

 

with regards

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Maybe, but after months of Ad-aware and Spybot not finding anything I've stopped using both.

 

...so this would mean that because I've seen a year of no virus infections, that I should cancel my Antivirus subscription?

 

You know you wouldn't need to worry about Drive-by Spyware installs if you would take the time to read the EULA (License Agreement). Saying Yes to everything, even just to make it leave you alone...it's going to come back and haunt you...

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That is both a bold and naive assumption.

 

Even if you don't use the real-time protection, MSASB's spyware scan is meticulous and thorough, and I wouldn't throw it away for the world. :(

 

with regards

Well, I did "throw it away" and I'm still clean. Long live 'boldness' and 'naivety'. It simply isn't necessary; Ad-aware, Spybot S & D and SpywareBlaster do the job.
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If you're only using Firefox then SpywareBlaster isn't needed at all. Its job is to block ActiveX controls in IE. Of course, if you keep your patches up to date with Windows, the main way you're going to get spyware in IE is if you click on things you shouldn't click. SWB is your backup protection for those cases.

 

There are plenty of other ways to get spyware no matter what mail or browser you use. P2P software is a common way for example. At the moment a lot of that spyware doesn't understand how to track Firefox once it's installed, but that will change as FF becomes more popular. FF has all the hooks to allow spyware, because they're the same hooks that enable good things like the Netcraft Toolbar for Firefox.

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So is mozilla safer? I contacted netcraft a while back, they stated that thier not going to have a version for mozilla, just f.f. so I thought I'd try it anyway...got this:

Posted Image

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If you're only using Firefox then SpywareBlaster isn't needed at all. Its job is to block ActiveX controls in IE.

Funny that MY spywareblaster protection status window says "mozilla/firefox protection is enabled."
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Funny that MY spywareblaster protection status window says "mozilla/firefox protection is enabled."

If you look to see what's being blocked, you'll only find cookies, in the IE block list...a lot of active X
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I credit spywareblaster, spy-bot's immunize feature, Zonealarm and Firefox for keeping my comp ad/spywarefree.

 

I've cut that list down to ZoneAlarm and Firefox and I still don't get spyware. :D

 

RayG

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...so this would mean that because I've seen a year of no virus infections, that I should cancel my Antivirus subscription?

 

 

Nope. Not at all. I'm using what I think is efficient software to help prevent spyware. Does your antivirus program work? If so, would you run three or four other antivirus programs just to make sure? I don't.

 

You know you wouldn't need to worry about Drive-by Spyware installs if you would take the time to read the EULA (License Agreement). Saying Yes to everything, even just to make it leave you alone...it's going to come back and haunt you...

But in many cases spyware is downloaded onto your system whether you're aware of it or not.

 

As for the ability of Firefox to prevent spyware, that's not just my opinion:

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/busi...038_paul15.html

http://www.spywareinfo.com/newsletter/arch...ay5.php#defense

http://channels.lockergnome.com/technobabb...t_spyware.phtml

 

RayG

Edited by RayG
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...and probably only 1 is required if the time is taken to read what's being installed before installing it!

Not everyone has a billion bazillion years to read through these things....I know I have better things to do. Usually I only download programs that are recommended by several reputable sources anyway, so I don't go and download everything that parks it's but in my face.

 

with regards

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No-one's asking that you read through the EULA word for word, because that would take a million years.

I don't read word for word either, but I do at least spend a minute quickly scanning for words that seem out of place.

 

Spyware has to ask to be placed on the computer. Be it through another program's EULA, or through it's own EULA, it must tell you otherwise you can sue them for putting unauthorized programs on your computer.

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No-one's asking that you read through the EULA word for word, because that would take a million years.

I don't read word for word either, but I do at least spend a minute quickly scanning for words that seem out of place.

I used to do that, but then I realised that I didn't really notice those kinda words when I saw them, because your brain is busy trying to scan lines or paragraphs at a time. I figure, you either read them or you don't.

 

The problem is, the shorter ones are usually legit - the ones you have to worry about are thousands of words long. :rolleyes:

 

with regards

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Firefox is highly resistant to malware infection. There are a growing number of malicious web sites attempting to target it but none of them do it very well. In all cases so far, every method of installing malware through Firefox requires that the user voluntarily install it. Some people obliviously will give the malware permission but I am not one of them. The rule of thumb for any browser is, if something pops up asking permission to install software or to run a script, say "no" unless you know why the box is asking permission and you know that it is no cause for concern.

And there it is. His reason for not being infected with spyware is not because he uses Firefox, he uses common sense by not clicking Yes to everything. You can apply the same logic to Internet Explorer, and it too will remain unaffected.

 

By using Firefox he cuts down on the many drive-by install spyware programs out there, but that doesn't cut out the spyware that comes hidden in the software available for download.

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