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FIRST OFF, let's get rid of the all caps, ok?

 

Secondly, it's gonna depend on a lot as to what the best computer is... you want to see the best Intel has to offer, check out Intelguy's rig and if you want to see pretty much what the best AMD currently has to offer, check out Shogan, Sik_L_Cel, or UDTSEAL's rigs.

 

If it were me, I'd go AMD all the way though.

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Last year was intel for most of the guys here. This year will be AMD for most of the guys here. Reason is due to benchmarks and gaming. For the rest of this year, at least, AMD will rule the roost. The answer may be the same next year and it may not. Only time will tell.

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Oh God, another one of these... :P

I'm with you, last thing we need is anouther AMD or Intel fanboy fight :rolleyes:

 

Both are good, its not a matter of which make, its more a matter of how much your going to spend? $1,000? $4,000? $7,000?

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I'm with you, last thing we need is anouther AMD or Intel fanboy fight :rolleyes:

 

Both are good, its not a matter of which make, its more a matter of how much your going to spend? $1,000? $4,000? $7,000?

Agreed! :beer:
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just my personal opinion i was always an intel fan and loved the products $$$ was not an issue as long as it was fast well i i gave up on intel and i brought a amd system cause i run alot of editing programs at one time and have been in love with it hence

 

for alot of users its the other way around so its basically up to your standards

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I don't see how intel is more stable than AMD.

I could build a cheap $100-ish computer with a VIA C3 processor (not saying that i ever will lol) and have it be "more stable" than an intel or an AMD computer. It just depends on what you use your computer for. If it's used for the internet only or something, then the uptime can be forever.

 

When i got my AMD, i did pay for what i got, and it was worth it too.

Whatever i said before in the other thread - it is the user who determines which one they like better. Also, both of the processors have their strong points and weak points. For example, intel's weak point is heat, since some of their fast processors (3.8 GHz) can't operate at 100% load for a while unless they clock down in speed.

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AMD if for no other reason than they make 64 bit CPUs. This time in computing history is just like when the first Pentiums came out which marked the first 32 bit processors. That was roughly 1995 and it took about 4 years for the first full 32 bit OS to come out (Windows 2000) and a couple years after that for a consumer 32 bit OS to come out (Windows XP). I think the cycle for introduction of 64 bit software and its rise to dominance (who would even think about using a 16 bit CPU or OS now?) will be much shorter this time. If you are building a rig from scratch get the Socket 939 AMD64 CPU with a motherboard that can handle dual channel RAM and PCI-X and you will be as future-proof as it is possible to be. You will also not pay any more than a top of the line Intel rig will cost and maybe less. And you will not be giving up a thing in speed, stability, or anything else in my humble opinion.

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AMD if for no other reason than they make 64 bit CPUs. This time in computing history is just like when the first Pentiums came out which marked the first 32 bit processors. That was roughly 1995 and it took about 4 years for the first full 32 bit OS to come out (Windows 2000) and a couple years after that for a consumer 32 bit OS to come out (Windows XP). I think the cycle for introduction of 64 bit software and its rise to dominance (who would even think about using a 16 bit CPU or OS now?) will be much shorter this time. If you are building a rig from scratch get the Socket 939 AMD64 CPU with a motherboard that can handle dual channel RAM and PCI-X and you will be as future-proof as it is possible to be. You will also not pay any more than a top of the line Intel rig will cost and maybe less. And you will not be giving up a thing in speed, stability, or anything else in my humble opinion.

Boy, have you got it all wrong...

 

The 1st 32bit processor was the 386, and that came out in the late 80s I believe...

 

Also, the 1st 32bit Windows was NT 3.1

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Like most have stated, it's personal preference and what you plan on doing.

 

Personally, I've only had Intel based computers. If I were to build my own, I'd go with AMD, just for personal curiousity and compare it to the Intel based computer I have now. Course I'd also have a KVM switch for less hassle.

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it is completly impossible to say that the pit has anything to do with how your comp runs on any benchmark its has... so you cant say because pit score is better in runs better in real life

 

 

 

 

2200+ is faster then my p4 LGA at 3.3

 

ddr333 512 is faster then my gig duel channel ddr400 same lat...

 

ive see mx440 compete with 5900 and 9800 series cards..

 

the pit tells you that it is for your own record to make your comp run faster

 

 

lol good luck

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it is completly impossible to say that the pit has anything to do with how your comp runs on any benchmark its has... so you cant say because pit score is better in runs better in real life

 

 

 

 

2200+ is faster then my p4 LGA at 3.3

 

ddr333 512 is faster then my gig duel channel ddr400 same lat...

 

ive see mx440 compete with 5900 and 9800 series cards..

 

the pit tells you that it is for your own record to make your comp run faster

 

 

lol good luck

couldnt agree more, pc pitstop is not a benchmark. I have PIII @ 1.69 Ghz that score 90% of what my P4 @ 4.1 ghz scores for cpu, then the pc 100 ram scores exactly half of what my P4 does. in a real bench mark my PIII scores a little 1/3rd of my p4 cpu score and the pc 100 ram scores 1/8 of what my PIV does. I see a lot really get wrapped up into their p/c pitstop scores.

 

now then, chicago it all depends on the application. Figure out what applications you run and then search them..........one of mine amd vs intel forgotten battles, that search took me to simhq.com and there I got to see actual bench marks of those two computers running a game I played. did the same with ati vs nvidia........you see dollar for dollar amd vs intel and nvidia vs ati the cpu and video cards will out score each other over a broad range of applications, mind you it usually isnt a major difference.

 

as far as 64 bit goes.........my opinion do not invest the extra money in one of these computers..........to date there isnt a lot of applications using 64 bit. Take a look at when 32 bit cpus were first introduced and then how long it took till 32 bit software came to be mainstream........it took years.

 

if you put together a PIV socket 775 3.4ghz or an amd 3400 you will be happy with both. If you do not run graphically demanding games...........you do not need a 400 dollar video card.

 

the question you posed is difficult to answer because nobody knows what applications you use. My family members are quite content on a Dell PII 450 100fsb with 384mb of ram and a 16mb riva tnt agp 2x video card with a pci graphics acellerator card. All they do is surf the net and send e-mails to their friends. It even runs games that they like to play just fine, then again they think that the bigger the monitor the better the computer.

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[My family members are quite content on a Dell PII 450 100fsb with 384mb of ram and a 16mb riva tnt agp 2x video card with a pci graphics acellerator card.]

 

Bolillo, that computer sounds like a Dimension XPSR450, with similar hardware to mine, however I have upgraded the processor and the video card. Just wondering what kind of score it gets here at the pit if you have tested it.

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I'm going with intel, more stable and better performance you pay for what you get, AMD = poor mans pentium

:o

 

 

 

Poor man's pentium? You wish.

 

 

 

Fanboy fights are not my thing, but I do like AMD over intel because of the performance:price ratio.

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[My family members are quite content on a Dell PII 450 100fsb with 384mb of ram and a 16mb riva tnt agp 2x video card with a pci graphics acellerator card.]

 

Bolillo, that computer sounds like a Dimension XPSR450, with similar hardware to mine, however I have upgraded the processor and the video card. Just wondering what kind of score it gets here at the pit if you have tested it.

it scores around a 500 on the pc pitstop test. ram is around 768 and the cpu is 494 I believe, disk score is usually about 20.

 

it currently is with out a monitor because my cheap 2nd hand 30 dollar crt just went bad. It only gets used when my son visits me, It is used for playing command and conquer yuri's revenge over the internet or lan.

 

in the past when it had it's own monitor or when it was hooked up to one of my 21" crt monitors family members thought that computer was just fine, infact they thought it was better than some of my PIIIs @ 1.69ghz (tualatin 1.4ghz cpu over clocked) just because it happened to have a trinitron 21" and the PIII running 1.24 Ghz faster was on a 17" trinitron...........all the family members did was surf the web and send e-mails.

 

the PII is currently running in its original configuration. XPS 450R dell purchased new in November 1998. It was the latest and greatest machine at the time. I see no point in upgrading it because my PIIIs will run any game the dell will, but much better. and they will also run any game my new PIV will run (graphics dumbed down a bit).

 

so the 450 mostly sits around and never gets used. Up till last summer the dell had a power leap 1.4ghz cpu and a pny 5200 ultra 128 mb vid card......after finding some cheap socket 370 mother boards the dell lost its power leap chip and the old PII 450 went back into it.

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....the dell lost its power leap chip and the old PII 450 went back into it.

Not clear as to what hapenned to your powerleap. Did the powerleap just fail or did you decide to remove it? I also upgraded my PII 450 to a powerlap 1.4 about 3 years ago and never had any problems with it.

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