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How Many Can Upload To My Server?


Guest mbelcher
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Guest mbelcher

I am trying to make a decision about hosting my own web server versus an offsite hosting company. I have a dsl connection that is currently at 1.5 megs download speed and 384 upload speed, upgradeable for $80 more to 7 megs download speed and 784 upload speed.

 

I would prefer to host my own server because I will be receiving audio files, roughly 1.5 gigs a month currently from court reporters which will then be downloaded not only by transcribers but also by proofreaders. The cost to host offsite seems prohibitive.

 

But if I understand correctly, my 384 upload speed is the bandwidth that my court reporters will use to upload their audio files , so that will need to be split among them. Most have cable connections with upload speeds of 192k. How many would be able to upload their audio files at the same time at 384? How many at 768?

 

Also, Transcribers and prooferes would be downloading the audio files, not uploading, so that means my 1.5 meg speed should be okay, shouldn't it?

 

Thanks in advance for all responses.

 

Mindy :help:

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well im not an expert at this not even sure about it but as many as they wont i think. but is that all there doing is uploading ot you? if yoru uploading ot them its diff but im nto too sure nm bout this its the biggest shtoi ive ever typed

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I dont think that you will be able to run an effective server with the type of connection that you have and the kind of load that you are expecting. You will need a more reliable and faster link to the internet for that. Hosting companies have OC3 and similar connections and most are very close to the backbone.

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So it sounds like you are going to set up a server at your location and connect it to a DSL. Are the reporters located at the same physical location as the server, so they will be getting local network speeds? Or are they off-site, sending their stuff through the 1.5 megabit direction? Who is retrieving the documents from the Internet using the 384 kilobit link?

 

You can do the math. There are about 2.5 million seconds in a month.

 

In the download (Internet to your server) direction, 1.5 megabits/sec times 2.5 million secs/month = 3.75 terabits/month. However, about 20% of that is eaten up by protocol overhead, and as the connection gets near saturation there will be problems with retransmissions. To be realistic you probably have about 2 terabits/month to work with, max. That is roughly 200 gigaBYTES/month.

 

In the upload (Your server to the Internet) direction, 384 kilobits/sec times 2.5 million secs/month = 960 gigabits/month. Accounting for reality, that's at most about 50 gigaBYTES/month.

 

It's unlikely that your traffic will be uniform at all hours of the day, so you need to take your peak traffic into account. For example, if most people are in the same time zone and tend to want to upload near the end of the work day, then you might need more headroom on the connection to provide good upload speeds for them all.

 

A hosting company usually offers better reliability and flexibility than hosting your own server. They can provide bandwidth, backup, after-hours maintenance, monitoring, and redundancy. For example, your DSL connection and server is a single point of failure, all the way from your server back to the point where your DSL provider peers to the Internet.

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Guest mbelcher

So it sounds like you are going to set up a server at your location and connect it to a DSL.

 

Yes, correct.

 

Are the reporters located at the same physical location as the server, so they will be getting local network speeds?

 

They are located offsite and have cable modem connections -- their upload speed at peak would be 192kbs

 

Or are they off-site, sending their stuff through the 1.5 megabit direction?

 

So if I understand correctly, the reporter at their location would upload the audio file to me, so the bandwidth they would be sharing with anyone else also uploading a file would be 1.5 megs -- is that correct? Anyone uploading would be sharing my download speed.

 

Who is retrieving the documents from the Internet using the 384 kilobit link?

 

Transcribers and proofreaders would both be downloading -- if they are retrieving a document from me, then they would be using the 384k link, correct? So anyone downloading would be sharing my upload speed, correct?

 

 

You can do the math. There are about 2.5 million seconds in a month.

 

In the download (Internet to your server) direction, 1.5 megabits/sec times 2.5 million secs/month = 3.75 terabits/month. However, about 20% of that is eaten up by protocol overhead, and as the connection gets near saturation there will be problems with retransmissions. To be realistic you probably have about 2 terabits/month to work with, max. That is roughly 200 gigaBYTES/month.

 

In the upload (Your server to the Internet) direction, 384 kilobits/sec times 2.5 million secs/month = 960 gigabits/month. Accounting for reality, that's at most about 50 gigaBYTES/month.

 

It's unlikely that your traffic will be uniform at all hours of the day, so you need to take your peak traffic into account. For example, if most people are in the same time zone and tend to want to upload near the end of the work day, then you might need more headroom on the connection to provide good upload speeds for them all.

 

Most everyone currently is in the same time zone. The reporters wil tend to want to upload near the end of the work day -- is there any way for me to know how many people could upload or download "comfortably"?

 

A hosting company usually offers better reliability and flexibility than hosting your own server. They can provide bandwidth, backup, after-hours maintenance, monitoring, and redundancy. For example, your DSL connection and server is a single point of failure, all the way from your server back to the point where your DSL provider peers to the Internet.

 

Thanks,

 

Mindy

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