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Failed - Seagate Black Armor NAS 220 2 x 2TB


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I HAVE THE
Seagate Black Armor NAS 220
2 X 2TB

Was in RAID 1 from 2011 - 2019
after one disk failed and left only the other

Now 2021 June - I cannot access it from Windows Explorer nor from the browser, I guess failed and the other HDD

 

Contacted Seagate support, but after some troubleshooting, nothing resulted...

 

They say HDD's File System is Ext2, Linux, and file names are the same... as read as NAS from Windows 10...

Also say this is very old product and probably passed its Life expectancy...

 

Well,  if remove HDD's from the unit, and connecting USB, I can only see them - if healthy - from a Linux machine like Ubuntu...?

 

I have No Linux PC, but having VMs with Linux, host Windows 10...

If while VM - Ubuntu Studio 20.04.2 - is running connect the USB HDD, if healthy, can view content if view from VM, even host Windows 10...?

 

How can act in case of recovery of my files in Linux ext2?

Can recover in Windows 10, Seagate suggested :

 

Please note that the files will likely be formatted in ext2 which cannot be read on Windows or Mac. You will need a compatibility software to access them and we can suggest one but please note we do not develop or support it.
Here's one you can use on Windows.
https://sourceforge.net/projects/ext2fsd/
Please be aware that the provided URL(s) is not a Seagate maintained or monitored website

 

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Posted (edited)

By saying Linux live disk

you mean create a Linux OS bootable USB Stick, and boot from this? After connect the ext2 HDD and check it...?

What about my VM: Linux, i proposed solution,...?

 

You know any Linux software for check /repair disks from errors...? Or file recovery tools in Linux...?

 

Linux meaning of Ubuntu flavor

 

Edited by lse123
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Fix one issue at a time:

 

Create a bootable Linux (Whatever OS you want) USB / Disc and see if you can access the drives using it.

(You can do it from VM but you'll need to open the VM > Connect > select the hard drive - You may need to mount the drive; the mount point usually is /media/.; or use gparted (Normally included with Linux) and mount the drive from there.) - Much easier from a live cd!

 

To check drive health in Linux have a look here:

 

https://www.addictivetips.com/ubuntu-linux-tips/check-hard-drive-health-on-linux/

 

 

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Can fix/read/recover-files of these drives by any way in Windows 10...?

Using, what's Seagate support suggested below, is any good...?

 

Please note that the files will likely be formatted in ext2 which cannot be read on Windows or Mac. You will need a compatibility software to access them and we can suggest one but please note we do not develop or support it.
Here's one you can use on Windows.
https://sourceforge.net/projects/ext2fsd/
Please be aware that the provided URL(s) is not a Seagate maintained or monitored website

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1 hour ago, lse123 said:

Here's one you can use on Windows.
https://sourceforge.net/projects/ext2fsd/

 

I don't run windows (openSuse is my OS of choice) but it does say only works up to windows 8; and the few comments on the site mention issues with mounting the drive.

You're best off going down the Linux Live CD route to recover the files if possible.

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After Boot from Ubuntu Live USB DRIVE Or Live DVD/CD, - what to use for recovery in Linux... Ubuntu?

Where save the files - if recoverable - so transfer back to Windows 10... ? What FS of another USB Stick?

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You can save to another external drive or mount the computer's hdd and copy to it, if there's room. As for recovery tools, photorec is pretty good and I think does more than just photos.

 

Tx 🤠

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11 hours ago, lse123 said:

You say save to an external usb drive

what file system format this…? So write from Ubuntu and read from Windows 10…? ExFAT…?

 

NTFS for the file system. - And as TX suggested if you can't access the files to copy them to another drive try Photorec on the drive; I've used it and it's good at finding and recovering most things.

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Before you try to recover the files you need to check the drive health; Photorec can only recover deleted files or files that haven't been corrupted by disc failure.

Don't waste your time on recovery until you know the drive is OK.

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Posted (edited)

Thank you for notice this

 

Can check the drive health of NAS RJ45 - HDDs without connecting USB 2.0/3.0, In other words with an ethernet connection?

 

HDDs Not seem in windows Explorer Network, neither can access the page of NAS in the browser, ...

 

How to check the drive health of these two HDDs of NAS...??? One HDD in the NAS corrupted before in 2019 and disjoint from the RAID 1 bridge, and from 2019 I have left one HDD in NAS - Not RAID 1... well???

 

IS IT THE ONLY CHOICE - REMOVE HDD FROM NAS - CONNECT USB, CHECK HEALTH - AFTER RECOVER????

Edited by lse123
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You need to connect the drives by USB to a Linux install / Live CD to test the disk health if the current format can't be read in windows.

 

You can try and run photorec from Linux - That's what I would do; you just need to install it from the Ubuntu repository.

 

Open a terminal window a type or copy/paste

 

sudo apt-get install testdisk

 

Run photorec as root

 

sudo photorec

 

follow the onscreen instructions.

 

Note the disc names are different in linux - you do not have c:/ or d:/ etc it will probably be dev /sdb or something simmilar.

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So you mean… this…? Right?

 

 

Fix one issue at a time:

 

Create a bootable Linux (Whatever OS you want) USB / Disc and see if you can access the drives using it.

(You can do it from VM but you'll need to open the VM > Connect > select the hard drive - You may need to mount the drive; the mount point usually is /media/.; or use gparted (Normally included with Linux) and mount the drive from there.) - Much easier from a live cd!

 

To check drive health in Linux have a look here:

 

https://www.addictivetips.com/ubuntu-linux-tips/check-hard-drive-health-on-linux/

 

 

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First question:

 

How did you load the Linux .iso file onto the USB (Did you make a bootable USB?) - There is a tool by RUFUS that is designed for this:

 

https://rufus.ie/en/

 

Second question: Why have you got Ubuntu Studio? of all the OS's you could have chosen. If I was you I would create a new bootable USB using Rufus and the below OS:

 

https://ubuntu.com/tutorials/create-a-usb-stick-on-windows#download

 

The rest of what you are doing looks correct. But you may need to go into BIOS and change the boot order to USB.

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