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Question about Viruses and VM's


nigsy

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Really from this thread here:

 

http://forums.pcpitstop.com/index.php?/topic/202834-power-locker-worse-than-crypto/

 

I run windows 8.1 inside Oracle Virtual Box. The host machine runs OpenSUSE.

 

I have windows own AV running on 8.1; but if the virtual OS got infected with anything could it also infect the host machine. I guess more likely if I were running XP as a VM inside another windows host.

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Just some thoughts on how it could affect the host machine..........

 

The possibility of having an exploit like cryptolocker or it's clones taking hold of the host machine would be dependant on whether any files or folders from the host machine are being shared and hence easily accessed by the virtual operating system. In this instance, the "shares" could be infected and locked.

 

If the VM is kept as an entity unto itself without shares on the host or through a network, then the exploit has no where to go. Get infected on the VM, delete it and reinstall clean, or let it live there and work at deciphering and prevention/protection. Supposedly (I haven't played with it yet) the newer "powerlocker" can detect a vm environment and lies dormant to avoid detection and reverse-engineering. :nospys:

 

What and how files and folders are being shared is more important than what operating system is being used to hold those files or folders.

 

How soon before "cloud based" storage, for example, is truly at risk? We all knew that it would be targeted, and it looks like these threats are moving in that direction.

 

:) Y

 

 

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Cheers guys.

 

I have a shared folder between the virtual and host machine - I'll remove that!

 

Hadn't even thought about cloud storage - Not something I use anyway; but I guess it only takes one person to upload to facebook or to a google shared drive and it potentially could spread to thousands

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One would think that the cloud based data (mostly back-ups created) would be already secured by it's own encryption and password

 

 

It might happen to get your cloud storage maliciously encrypted if you were logged into your cloud account at the same time you got hit with a crypto locker type of virus

 

 

 

 

 

 

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