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How to do installation ubuntu 12.04.3


joestpaul
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I downloaded a 32 bit ubuntu 12.04.3 iso and burned to a dvd.

 

Now,

 

Could somebody tell me how to install ubuntu and prepare the hard drive. Ubuntu is the only os, I will install on the 60 GB Hard drive. I haven't installed linux ubuntu in 10 years. I have 1 GB Ram Memory, and a AMD 1.2 GHz Processor

 

I repair and sell computers and someone told me it would be cheaper to sell ubuntu computers because the software is free, and there's a lot of people using linux these days

 

I have researched how to install ubuntu but, I haven't found instructions about how to prepare the 60 GB hard drive, and free space.

 

Does anyone know how to find additional software for ubuntu for dvd cd burning and dvd play back software?

 

Thanks for your help

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I have windows xp professional currently installed, but I just want ubuntu, because I don't think a 60 GB hard drive is big enought to dual boot xp pro and ubuntu 12.04.3

 

When I boot from the ubuntu disc, I am asked to select a language and then to select install ubuntu.

 

Here's the error message I get,

 

4. 4663651 Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs on un known block ( 0,0 )

Edited by joestpaul
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If ubuntu files have to be edited to get the system to work, then why is it even on the market?

 

I don't have to edit much to install windows operating system software?

 

Is it worth trying to learn ubuntu, or is it just going to be a headache?

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Well for starters it is not "on the market" It is free to download, to install, and to use on as many computers as your heart desires.

 

My guess would be that it will work on your hardware better than windows would out of the box, but you have provided no information about your hardware other than the hard drive size, so it is impossible to know what you may or may not have to do to get everything working.

 

Whether or not something will be a headache, or worth learning is completely and 100% up to you.

 

As for Windows XP, well I will keep my opinion about that lame, incredibly buggy, and vulnerable system to myself :rofl3:

 

All that said personally I would not install Ubuntu, but would chose a better, more robust, more and easier to configure system, perhaps

 

http://software.opensuse.org/123/en

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/

Edited by Bruce
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Well for starters it is not "on the market" It is free to download, to install, and to use on as many computers as your heart desires.

 

My guess would be that it will work on your hardware better than windows would out of the box, but you have provided no information about your hardware other than the hard drive size, so it is impossible to know what you may or may not have to do to get everything working.

 

Whether or not something will be a headache, or worth learning is completely and 100% up to you.

 

As for Windows XP, well I will keep my opinion about that lame, incredibly buggy, and vulnerable system to myself :rofl3:

 

All that said personally I would not install Ubuntu, but would chose a better, more robust, more and easier to configure system, perhaps

 

http://software.opensuse.org/123/en

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/

I do know that linux in open source and free, but I just think if an os is created,it should work out of the box without hours of configuring.

 

I change computers often whenever I sell them and pickup new computers,So, I use xp, Vista and 7 every other week, until April when Xp will no longer be supported. I don't keep a computer for myself. I'm using a different computer all the time. I never save information either, just in Google chrome favorites that saved whenever I reload google chrome on a new pc

 

 

I wanted to use linux on computer that are running Xp when they stop supporting them in April 2014

Edited by joestpaul
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So you don't own a computer to test and get familiar with a new and different operating system.

 

You just want to thump it on other peoples computers?

 

As for working out of the box Linux always has for me. In fact it has better support for all the hardware I have ever installed it on. I am however aware that like any operating system there may be issues with some hardware, and telling someone what that hardware is when seeking help is extremely important if help is what you are actually looking for. Being someone who works on and sells computers you should know that.

 

Are you seeking assistance or just complaining?

 

Why have you chosen and old version to install rather then the latest?

 

Have you actually looked for the error message you are getting?

 

It would seem to me if you intend to do as you say and install Linux on customers computers you should become very, very familiar with it first.

 

I am just guessing here but a system with a 60GB hard drive is probably ten years or more old. So it could have have an Intel, or AMD, or SIS, or VIA, Nvidia, or ATI or a combination of a couple of them. Could be any number of problems or an issue with a specific chipset, or controller, or even as simple as a BIOS setting.

Edited by Bruce
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joestpaul, tell us exactly what motherboard, CPU, ram and make/model of hard drive you are using and then maybe we can give you some suggestions.

 

 

 

 

:geezer:

The computer is an older HP 7950 AMD motherboard Athlon 1.2 GHz processor 2 GB PC133 Ram Memory, 60 GB IDE Hard drive....I just thought that whatever version Linux I put on this computer would install. I heard linux 32 Bit ubuntu software works good with older slower machines.

 

I just looked online and found that the above error could be related to a bad burnt copy of ubuntu 12.04.3 that I put on a dvd. I may take the guys suggestion here as he stated above and try linux mint. Would that work better for an older computer. I will try to install linux on a computer for myself and use it for a while to get the feel of it.If It gets to complicated I'll go back to windows os's

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I would not expect any of the above mentioned distros to run very well on a single-core amd CPU with PC 133 ram. You may just meet the minimum requirements...but do not expect a pleasant experience.

 

I would suggest Lubuntu or bodhi Linux for such an old machine. Lubuntu is more traditional looking while bodhi is a bit different, but very smooth running with minimal requirements.

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I would not expect any of the above mentioned distros to run very well on a single-core amd CPU with PC 133 ram. You may just meet the minimum requirements...but do not expect a pleasant experience.I would suggest Lubuntu or bodhi Linux for such an old machine. Lubuntu is more traditional looking while bodhi is a bit different, but very smooth running with minimal requirements.

Thanks for all your input and suggestions.......as you can see, I don't know anything about linux....

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I would not expect any of the above mentioned distros to run very well on a single-core amd CPU with PC 133 ram. You may just meet the minimum requirements...but do not expect a pleasant experience.

 

I would suggest Lubuntu or bodhi Linux for such an old machine. Lubuntu is more traditional looking while bodhi is a bit different, but very smooth running with minimal requirements.

I'm burning a copy of the ISO file for bodhi to a dvd disc and in image burn it ask me to choose standard or ASC II which do I choose?

 

I still get the error when I try to install bodhi 2.4.0

 

Kernel panic - not syncing: VFS: Unable to mount root fs on unknown block,

 

I boot from the acs II iso image on the dvd disc, and I'm asked if I want to edit anything, I can't write what it say because the screen is only 30 seconds and many choices So, I just wait the 30 seconds for the next screen where I get the above error

Edited by joestpaul
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not sure about that error. i have never tried it on a machine that old, but i still think it should work. a couple of things which you may or may not know (sorry if this is all stuff you already are aware of):

 

you downloaded an ISO file, which is an image file and as such, must be burned as an image file (NOT like a normal data cd or dvd). i just downloaded the latest bodhi file (version 2.4.0) and i burned it to a CD....a DVD is way overkill. the bodhi ISO is only like 500-600mb's and will easily fit onto a cd. i saw no options asking me to burn it in "standard or ASC II". like i said, it needs to be burned as an image file (ISO)....what burning program are you using to create this disc with?

 

i just happen to have a very old rig laying around here which i have not even looked at in years, i mean a LOT of years! it is an amd athlon, socket A, XP3200 (barton core) on an ancient Abit NF7-S....anyone remember these?? lol, i have been wanting to plug this thing for the longest time....thanks for getting me to try it! it was sitting in an old antec case, not screwed into the case (no standoffs to be found), so i decided to try it outside the case....

 

not being very careful, i layed it out quickly and did not realize a bottom corner of the motherboard was touching metal and after pushing the power button....it started to post, but then i heard a "pop" and saw the top of a capacitor crack and bubble up a bit!! i quickly shut down and figured i had fried this old setup for good.

 

anyways, i cleared the bottom of the mobo from anything conductive (duh) and tried again. this time (to my amazement) it booted up fine from the cd, installed without a hitch onto a 160gb, IDE hard drive and is running absolutely perfect!! btw, this board has no built-in graphics, so i popped in an AGP, nvidia ti-4200 (wow, this stuff is so classic) to try things out and again, i am just blown away at how smoothly Bohdi runs on here! it ran great from the "live" cd, but runs even better after installed onto the hard drive.

 

...how is this even working after the cap popped when i first tried it??? i have no idea, but i kid you not...it is running like a champ! i may go dig up some standoffs and actually put this thing together correctly! only draw-back is this old antec case's 80mm fans and the old thermaltake cooler that are installed on here are louder then a 747!!! :rofl3:

 

again thanks for getting me to try out this old machine, its been gathering dust for about a decade or so!

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You can switch the leads around on the molex so you can run the 80mm fans at 12 volts, 7 volts (slower and quieter) or 5 volts (much slower and quieter) Running it on 5 volts might give you really poor air flow. Those older Antec cases suk.... they use proprietary fan mounts and they only accept an 80mm fan

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joestpaul - I use CDBurnerXP for burning CDs and DVDs in Windows XP and it even burns .iso files as image too. Haven't had a problem yet burning Linux discs with it.

http://download.cnet.com/CDBurnerXP/3000-2646_4-10409086.html

 

Joe C - That's a great tip, never even thought to try that. Especially handy for machines that don't have fan controller and mobo that does not support PWM fan control.

 

iamgeorgeareu - I've had a couple mobos before that surprisingly powered on and booted successfully even with multiple "popped" caps. Never understood how that was possible, but it's an easy fix if you have basic soldering skills and can obtain good replacement caps.

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I use this to burn all my cd's and dvd's and yes Linux .iso images. Works great for me...

 

 

 

 

:geezer:

You forgot the linky, old hoss. :mrgreen:@OP: Much good advice in this thread, I suggest you heed it. I'm sure caintry_boy will post his link once he realizes he didn't, but you do need an app to burn ISO discs in Windows. I forget which one I used, or I'd gladly mention it.And Bruce is right on the money as always. If you plan on selling Linux machines and want to offer even some limited customer support to people, you have to know about Linux. I don't know Ubuntu from Jack, but I'll second his recommendation of openSUSE. Its installation process gives very clear guidance on how to install openSUSE on a PC, whether you wish to dual boot with Windows or format the drive for a total Linux machine.Good luck, Joe, I wish you and anyone else only the best if they seek to come over to Linux.

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