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I am frequently getting messages after surfing the net that I am running low on available memory. I let it clear out the temp files, etc. and now am trying to remove programs that we no longer need or use. But I don't want to inadvertently remove something we still use even though it says, for example, "last used on 1/1/2003". I don't really trust those dates because even though sometimes it says last used 4 or 5 years ago, I know I just used it last week or month. Three examples of something I'm not sure I'm still using is:

 

Microsoft.NET Framework 2.0 Service Pack 2- 188MB

Microsoft.NET Framework 3.0 Service Pack 2- 180MB

Microsoft.NET Framework 3.5 Service Pack 1- 29MB

 

When I highlight the above 3 items to possibly remove, they give no "last-used" date.

My computer is an older one (about 4-5 years old) and I think it only has 2 GB. Any help is appreciated.

Edited by fireman1953
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When your pc is saying you dont have enough memory (in this case) I think it is talking about RAM.. Does it say hard drive space or "Memory"?

 

If it says memory then it means Ram..Will have to shut down some running programs through ctrl+alt+del...

 

When you open task manager (ctrl, alt, del) how much ram does it say you have and how much is being used?

 

It can also be talking about Virtual Memory or your page file (swap file)...Let us know how much ram you have installed and what OS you are runnin!

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or try this right click on My Computer

click Advance Tab

Performance,,,,,,,,,Settings

Put Green Dot in..........Let Windows Choose Whats Best For My Computer.

In the Virtual Memory Click on Change

Put green dot On System Manage Size

Click Ok to close And Ok again

Restart your computer

Another thing to do clear up space

download and run Ccleaner

 

http://filehippo.com/download_ccleaner/

 

And restart your computer

Edited by mme
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Download CCleaner from Piriform and run that, just to clear out some temporary files. Now, you need to tell us some things.

 

At the top of CCleaner will be computer specs, please post. If you hit 'Tools' on the left and then 'Startup' you will get a list of processes that launch when the computer is booted up. Disable those you don't need. You can also download 'What's Running' and see if there's anything you can get rid of. I've cut the number of processes on Windows machines in half, so there is a point to doing this. Really though, you might be better off getting help from a HJT advisor as the logs display not only malware but startup services that they can help you with.

 

One thing to keep in mind is that RAM is cheap these days and easy to install. There is a scanner at Crucial that can tell you exactly what RAM to buy. RAM almost always makes a computer faster.

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Click Start, click Run, and type msconfig to launch the system configuration utility. Click the startup tab, then click the Disable All button.

Don't know about Fireman's computer, but I'd have no antivirus if I did that.  It would be prudent to find out what's being disabled.
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Sorry I haven't replied back yet folks, but the low spce message hasn't come bck up again. My daughter got her own PC for Christmas so I have removed most f her stuff and I think that freed up a lot of space. I will try the suggestions you guys put forth and see what happens.

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MS Windows XP SP3 Intel Pentium 4 CPU 2.00 GHz 256 MB RAM NVCIDIA GeForce 4 MX420

 

hmmm. That would tend to tell the story, I think.

 

Many folks will tell you that XP consumes 384mb RAM simply to support the operating system.

Thus, your machine would be dipping into Virtual Memory (emulated from HD paging file)

If this is the case, performance would be compromised frequently on that machine.

 

Many of the same folks would suggest that 1024mb (1gb) RAM is the "sweet spot" for XP performance, with little to gain by increasing beyond that, unless you frequently run resource intensive applications such as video rendering and gaming.

 

If you intend to use that machine for the next few years, it may be worth it to you to upgrade the physical RAM

 

Crucial is a company that offers an online scan to assist with identifying installed RAM and recommending potential upgrade solutions.

http://www.crucial.com/

Use Internet Explorer to browse to that location and download/run their scanner. (doesn't work with Firefox)

 

You don't have to buy from Crucial just to use their scanner, though sometimes they do offer good prices.

 

Other companies offer similar scanner service, but I like the service from Crucial.

Your Choice.

 

Best Regards

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I had 256 mb of RAM on an XP machine...my first desktop. In 2003 it was fine, but these days it won't cut it. I added more RAM on the 2.7 GHZ Celeron and it was significantly better. A format would also help.

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MS Windows XP SP3 Intel Pentium 4 CPU 2.00 GHz 256 MB RAM NVCIDIA GeForce 4 MX420

 

hmmm. That would tend to tell the story, I think.

 

Many folks will tell you that XP consumes 384mb RAM simply to support the operating system.

Thus, your machine would be dipping into Virtual Memory (emulated from HD paging file)

If this is the case, performance would be compromised frequently on that machine.

 

Many of the same folks would suggest that 1024mb (1gb) RAM is the "sweet spot" for XP performance, with little to gain by increasing beyond that, unless you frequently run resource intensive applications such as video rendering and gaming.

 

If you intend to use that machine for the next few years, it may be worth it to you to upgrade the physical RAM

 

Crucial is a company that offers an online scan to assist with identifying installed RAM and recommending potential upgrade solutions.

http://www.crucial.com/

Use Internet Explorer to browse to that location and download/run their scanner. (doesn't work with Firefox)

 

You don't have to buy from Crucial just to use their scanner, though sometimes they do offer good prices.

 

Other companies offer similar scanner service, but I like the service from Crucial.

Your Choice.

 

Best Regards

 

 

Doug,

 

If I decide to upgrade my RAM, is this something a somewhat handy but not real computer-literate person can do at home? Also, finally got the low disk space message again. It says" low disk space on ©. I click clear this space and it mostly deletes unnecessary temp files. Afterwards, it said "your Windows drive now has 846 MB of available space."

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It's easy. Turn off the computer, unplug all connections. Set on a table and ground yourself, then open the case. You'll see the RAM clamped in a slot. At each end should be a plastic clamp, lift these and remove the memory. Place the new one in (don't touch the pins) and make sure it is seated properly. It may be a pain in the :filtered: to get both clamps to snap shut, but if you don't, you'll have some issues.

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If I decide to upgrade my RAM, is this something a somewhat handy but not real computer-literate person can do at home? Also, finally got the low disk space message again. It says" low disk space on ©. I click clear this space and it mostly deletes unnecessary temp files. Afterwards, it said "your Windows drive now has 846 MB of available space."

Hi fireman1953,

 

As Adam suggests, the process is relatively elementary.

If the machine in question is the Dell 4550 listed in your profile, then Dell may make the explanation even easier with their own instructions from their search-able online machine manual.

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/SYST...ace.htm#1101964

 

If this is your first time inside the box, then be sure to read and follow the Safety Instructions.

 

Best Regards

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Turn off the computer, unplug all connections. Set on a table and ground yourself

Pretty close, Adam, except for the grounding part.  The human and the hardware need to be at the same potential, which need not be ground potential.  The correct method is to wear an antistatic wrist strap connected to a part of the computer's metal chassis.
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If I decide to upgrade my RAM, is this something a somewhat handy but not real computer-literate person can do at home?

Installing RAM is quite easy, as others have said, and it's the single most effective way to improve computer performance.

 

There are a couple of items to keep in mind.  The "grounding" issue relates to static electrical discharges that can easily damage the system and the hardware you're installing.  Using an antistatic wrist band eliminates 99% of the problem.  The other 1% is managed simply by leaving the hardware in its protective antistatic bag until you're ready to install it.

 

You may find that the memory module takes considerable force to seat in the slot.  If this occurs, support the underside of the motherboard if possible.

 

Also, finally got the low disk space message again. It says" low disk space on ©. I click clear this space and it mostly deletes unnecessary temp files. Afterwards, it said "your Windows drive now has 846 MB of available space."

That's simply too little free space.  Restart the computer and begin tapping the F8 key before Windows starts to load.  Use the arrow keys to select Safe Mode and press Enter.  Log on to the Administrator account and click Yes to continue.

 

Click Start, My Computer, Tools, Folder Options, and View.  Select "Show hidden files and folders", click OK.  Leave the window open for now.

 

Click Start and Run, type Temp and click OK to open the folder.  Click Edit and Select All, then click File and Delete.  Confirm the deletion if prompted.  Close the folder.

 

In the My Computer window, double-click the C drive.  Right-click "Documents and Settings" and click Search.  Type "temp" under filename (please include the quotes around temp).  Under "More advanced options", select "Search hidden files and folders" and "Search subfolders".  Click Search.

 

When the search completes, double-click the separators to the left and right of "In Folder" so that the location of the Temp files and folders can be seen.  For each Local Settings folder, delete the Temp folder it contains by right-clicking and clicking Delete.

 

When done, click "Change file name".  Type Content.ie5 under filename and click Search.  Delete all of the Content.ie5 folders.

 

Close Search.  If the Recycle Bin is not on the Desktop, click Start, right-click My Computer, click Explore.  Right-click the Recycle Bin, click Empty Recycle Bin, and confirm.

 

Restart the computer normally.

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that sounds like a hellava lot to do just to clean out a temp folder ...... get this and it will do it in about two clicks

The utility you referenced is intended more as a tracks eraser that anything else.  When tested, it did NOT delete the contents of the Windows\Temp or any user's temp folder, or that of any orphaned IE temp files folders, which were my main concerns.  It does not perform the tasks described in by previous post.
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You are flat out wrong Tom, I just now tested it myself, and C:\windows\temp folder did in fact empty out as well as the IE temp internet files folder....How did you test? because it is faulty. Please be more specific on your testing methods

Edited by Joe C
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You are flat out wrong ... Please be more specific on your testing methods

Don't tell me I'm wrong, I reported exactly what did not occur.  I tested twice on XP running from a FAT32 partition, with the program running with administrator's rights.

 

In any case, the fairly foolproof manual methods I described do the job without a 3rd-party program, so I'll await Fireman's report as to his results.

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How many people run on FAT32 in their XP systems today? A majority of pc's are OEM and I have not seen an XP OEM install from any manufacture that has the o.s. partition as FAT32. I tested it on an XP system using NTFS and it cleaned out both windows and IE temp files. I am not saying your method does not work, just that there other methods

 

 

I honestly can not understand why you would test any software with a FAT32 partition, when almost all XP installs out there today are using NTFS

Edited by Joe C
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FYI about Clean up!

  • CleanUp! only deletes the current user's Temporary Internet Files, Cookies and History. On a machine with several users (i.e. any machine where you have to log in before using Windows) there may be several areas - different for each user - set aside for temporary files. This is the most common reason I receive this question - simply a misunderstanding of exactly what files CleanUp! is trying to remove (and which ones it shouldn't!).
  • You - or possibly your System Administrator - have changed your default internet cache directory. If the IE cache directory has been changed, then you are likely to still have a "Temporary Internet Files" folder on your disk. Windows CleanUp! only attempts to clean the directory that Internet Explorer is currently configured to use for it's cache. If this is *not* the "Temporary Internet Files" folder, then the "Temporary Internet Files" folder will not be emptied. This is by design - CleanUp! has to be careful not to delete too much. :^)
  • CleanUp! is a powerful and easy-to-use application that removes temporary files created while surfing the web, empties the Recycle Bin, deletes files from your temporary folders and more.
Edited by Joe C
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Tom, Joe, is there ant reason or benefit to using a FAT partition as opposed to NTFS? I ask because I worked on my MIL's desktop the other day and noticed that it was setup in FAT and the options under properties for My Computer>C: weren't clickable like I'm used to.

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I honestly can not understand why you would test any software with a FAT32 partition

I did so to eliminate permissions issues.  The file system itself should not be a factor in the results I'm seeing.

 

I tested again, while logged on to an account with administrator's rights.  No files were deleted from that account, or from the Windows\Temp folder or any other temp folder.  About 250 files, out of about 350, that were deleted from one of the four temporary Internet files folders in a different (limited) account; the other three folders still contain over 9MB.

 

I noted that the index.dat files had been deleted from several Content.ie5 and History.ie5 folders.  Four of these were located in the LocalService account, which the utility has no business meddling with, as far as I'm concerned.

 

On a last run, I unselected the "Cleanup All Users" options.  This time files were deleted from the logged-on account's Internet temp folders, or rather from two of them.  The other two maintained their contents.

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I suggest that you read up about any software before you test it out.

About 250 files, out of about 350, that were deleted from one of the four temporary Internet files folders in a different (limited) account; the other three folders still contain over 9MB.

Clean up! is not designed to clean other users files.

CleanUp! only deletes the current user's Temporary Internet Files, Cookies and History. On a machine with several users (i.e. any machine where you have to log in before using Windows) there may be several areas - different for each user - set aside for temporary files. This is the most common reason I receive this question - simply a misunderstanding of exactly what files CleanUp! is trying to remove (and which ones it shouldn't!).

but it did clean out your temp files in your account.

index.dat files will be replaced by windows upon reboot

 

By your own account you state that you are not using a standard system as a single user, which is not what Clean Up! was designed for. Try it on a pc with one account and a standard file system that is in the default locations as it would be with many other folks running XP in the real world today

Edited by Joe C
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