Jump to content

The EVGA Classified over the ASUS Rampage II Extreme


Recommended Posts

Well, I was very convinced that the ASUS Rampage II Extreme was the motherboard for me . . . .

 

 

Posted Image

 

But after doing more research and trying to compare motherboards, I'm thinking now of going with the EVGA Classified (141-BL-E760-A1) instead. . . .

 

 

Posted Image

 

 

These two reviews were the main sellers for me . . .

 

http://www.guru3d.com/article/evga-x58-sli...ssified-review/

 

http://hothardware.com/Articles/eVGA-X58-3...erboard/?page=1

 

I was amazed that the Classified has 2 x 8pin CPU connectors . . .

 

 

Posted Image

 

 

My PCPn'P also has an extra 8-pin connector that has never been used.

 

 

Posted Image

 

 

It's like this motherboard and my PSU were meant to be! :wub: . . .

 

I am guessing that the PSU was originally designed for a dual CPU situation. But this would be a perfect chance to make full use of what my PSU offers. . . . But I wonder if that will actually yield any real world difference when overclocking. The review by guru3d says that this makes it possible to pump 600W into the CPU. But I know that's obviously not relevant with the i7 920. My only thought is that maybe it will keep the voltage a little stiffer and less prone to fluctuation.

 

The motherboard also supposedly has "300% more gold content in the CPU socket." Can anybody comment on this? . . . Does that really make a difference or is that some sort of gimmick? Does the gold allow for great conductivity and hence better clockspeeds?

Link to post
Share on other sites

The gold in the CPU socket is kind of like the gold connectors on speaker wires. It won't give a better signal or allow for higher overclocking but since it's not very reactive it won't corrode or tarnish. Corrosion would affect conductivity. If they were after the best conductivity they'd use Silver.

Link to post
Share on other sites

To choose a mobo, with evga currently having a solid X48 board, and a pretty good X58 board+evga support is far better than asus's

 

So Classified wins hands down, but seriously.. get a reg X58 and you'll be living happily ever after..

Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont think you will see much of an overclock difference...

 

Most "test" for high end overclock results... use extreme methods of cooling if you know what i mean. ;)

 

But in real world situations its all in the experience of the user in the amount of overclocking you will see..

 

But i had the debate of the x58 classified, rampage II extreme and the rampage II gene....if i wanted to spend the money on the top end board then i would go with the x58 classified...

 

The x58 classified does have a nice lifetime warranty, and has a LOT of options in the overclock department.... but how long are you actually going to have a motherboard before it goes out of style?

 

I just went with the RII gene because of the cost point and the good overclockability of the board. and i am never going to use more than 2 cards in SLI...

Edited by ctran503
Link to post
Share on other sites

???? why not kram ????

 

because i'd say yes... :rofl2:

 

:b33r:

 

I pulled out my modular 8pin cable from the retail box (not being used, psu has 3 of them) and the little squares and half round/half squares deals do not match up.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, that's some pricey stuff. . . . The RAM is the one part of my system that I'm still not fully decided on. . . . I'm trying to keep it around $150, no more than $200. . . . Most of the 1866MHz 8-8-8 is in that range. I think that would be good enough for me. . . . I've never noticed a huge difference with how fast the RAM is running. I find I can easily spend an extra $100 to $150 for RAM that is only 10% faster and then not even notice any real world difference. :shrug:
Link to post
Share on other sites

Stability for overclocking is the reason I paid the price.

 

el kido seems to like this memory. It's in the ballpark of what you want to pay.

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16820231254

 

Thank you for the recommendation. . . . The only thing that concerns me about that RAM is the loose timings.

 

I've found that if I have to choose between high-speed/loose timings and low-speed/tight timings, that the latter seems to give me more headroom than the former.

 

In other words, whenever I've picked up RAM that is rated at high-speed and loose timings, I find that I'm not able to tighten up the timings very much, even if I run the RAM at a speed below the rated speed. I'm also not able to overclock by much because the RAM is already close to it's max out of the box. So there isn't much flexibility.

 

On the other hand, when the timings are tight out of the box then I find that I can hit several different speeds depending on how I loosen the timings, sometimes speeds that are higher than what the so-called high-speed RAM can do. . . .

 

This is just my experience. I'm not saying it's a general rule. I haven't tested hundreds of RAM sticks, so perhaps someone who has gone through more brands/models can offer more insight.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was amazed that the Classified has 2 x 8pin CPU connectors . . .

Posted Image

My PCPn'P also has an extra 8-pin connector that has never been used.

Posted Image

It's like this motherboard and my PSU were meant to be! :wub: . . .

 

I am guessing that the PSU was originally designed for a dual CPU situation. But this would be a perfect chance to make full use of what my PSU offers. . . . But I wonder if that will actually yield any real world difference when overclocking. The review by guru3d says that this makes it possible to pump 600W into the CPU. But I know that's obviously not relevant with the i7 920. My only thought is that maybe it will keep the voltage a little stiffer and less prone to fluctuation.

 

I pulled out my modular 8pin cable from the retail box (not being used, psu has 3 of them) and the little squares and half round/half squares deals do not match up.

 

Kram . . . I was reading this webpage and I thought of your comment above . . .

 

Perhaps you could use one of these adapters mentioned on the webpage . . .

 

 

Posted Image

 

 

Like I mentioned above, I don't know if it really makes a difference because an 8-pin connector is already capable of 336W. The CPU is not likely to use more than 220W even under load at 4.0GHz. (See this article.)

 

However, I figure that by spreading the power across more PSU wires and more traces on the motherboard, this could result in greater stability. For example, when the CPU is using 220W, with a 8-pin connector, each power wire is delivering about 4.6 amps. This is about 50% of the maximum 7 amps per wire.

 

With two 8-pin connectors on the Classified, each wire is carrying about 2.3 amps which drops things down to about 25% of the maximum 7 amps per wire.

 

By the way, I was really surprised to learn in this article that by overclocking the CPU to 4.0GHz, the result is using 50% more power to accomplish the same task when running stock!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...