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Computer Won't Stay On


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This machine keeps giving me more problems the longer I have it. Each stumps me further than the last. :hammer:

 

This time, it's randomly shutting down without any warning. Any programs I have open will crash, giving me the "this program is not responding" dialogue. It won't stay on more than 30 seconds or so. It doesn't stay shut down, either. If I leave the plug in, it will barely begin to boot up before shutting down again, in rapid succession. I'm keeping it unplugged for the sake of preventing (further?) damage.

 

There are no beeps, clicks or odd sounds. Everything sounds as it should. I was having no problems with it until a half hour ago.

 

From what I have found on the subject of random shutdowns, it could be hardware or heat related. I'd monitor the temperature if only it would stay on long enough for me to download and install the program. And I don't have a clue to find out whether or not it's hardware related. Is there a possibility it could be software related? :h3lp:

 

Also, for the sake of reference, what are some accurate, reliable temperature monitoring programs?

 

Update: I figured that it was probably overheating. I opened it up to remove the heatsink and dust it out. One of the retaining clips was not secured (not sure why) and the heatsink lifted right off of the cpu. I could never get it off before. There's this stuff that looks like gray putty that I think held it on when it was cold. I didn't touch it, though. Could my cpu be damaged?

Edited by tokaia
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The CPU may not be damaged.

 

You can use rubbing alcohol to remove the old sealant. The higher alcohol concentration the better. The best thing to use and you don't mind spending about $10 is 'Arctic Silver ArctiClean'. A two step process. It comes with a bottle of thermal material remover. You just put a couple drops on and wait about 30 sec. Then you use the purifier to prep the surface for your new thermal paste.

 

A coffee filter is one of the best items to use due to the fact it is lint free.

 

You can use Arctic Silver Thermal Siver Adhesive to put the heatsink back on the CPU

 

http://daystar-store.com/index.asp?PageAct...&ProdID=428

 

Be sure your cpu fan is also working properly.

Edited by Kniht
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How necessary is it for me to put new sealant on? I dusted out my fan and heatsink, re-fastened the clips and turned it on. Still doing the same stuff. I don't think it's a power supply failure, because it goes through the actual shutdown process.

 

How quickly can a cpu overheat?

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i have always used 99% alcohol and coffee filter's works great and very cheap. i would also recommend using this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16835100007 since it is not an adhesive(basicly it is glue) like the product that was listed above, if you ever need to upgrade your heatsink good luck getting it off.

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How necessary is it for me to put new sealant on? I dusted out my fan and heatsink, re-fastened the clips and turned it on. Still doing the same stuff. I don't think it's a power supply failure, because it goes through the actual shutdown process.

 

How quickly can a cpu overheat?

 

i would try applying new thermal grease/compound and see if the problem still exists. a CPU can over heat in a matter of seconds.

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Once you break the seal that the thermal compound makes between the heatsink and the processor you should clean the processor the way others here have recommended then apply new thermal compound. Do not use adhesive that is not for processors.

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Does the thermal compound degrade over time and require occasional replacement? More specifically, could my factory paste have failed because of age? My heatsink/fan assembly just came right off- it never would before. Secondly, how could the assembly's securing clip have come loose? I want to prevent it in the future.

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A cpu clip is very secure -- it needs human assistance to get it loose...

 

If it stayed on long enough to get shipped from the factory -- then it was on there for good.

 

There is a plastic ear on the cpu socket to hook the fan and cooler onto -- make sure the ear is in good condition...

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I picked up the alcohol from Walgreen's and the Arctic Silver from Radio Shack. Glad I didn't have to order it online and wait. It works just fine now- better than before, in fact. Programs are running much quicker and more smoothly. Thanks everyone, for your help! :wub::b33r::clap:

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Alrighty, it looks as though I've spoken too soon. It's doing it again. The monitoring program I had running at the time of shutdown said the cpu temp was at 42 degrees Celsius. It would fluctuate between 40 and 50 degrees under usage typical for me, and 32 to 39 idle. I'm not sure what the danger temps are, but I read someplace that for an Intel processor, it's about 82 degrees Celsius.

 

I just don't get it. It was running fine last night and all day today, until I was in the middle of a video game- the same thing I was doing the first time it shut down. It's obvious that the Arctic Silver didn't fix the problem, and I'm out of ideas. :h3lp:

 

I wonder if my machine is not-so-subtly trying to tell me that it's ready for the scrap heap? :cr@sh:

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My Intel processor will start acting strange at 59c and since I never have let it get over that don't know what the shut down point is for it :geezer: Heat generation problems are about more than the processor the video card can be running hot enough to cause problems as can the hard drives. Also room temps not hot enough to be uncomfortable to a person might be just warm enough for the tipping point in a computer system.

 

During spring and summer I have to run my system with the case open and an airconditioner blowing into the case to keep things cool. You might try leaving the case open with a small household fan blowing into the case to see if that helps. Check the fan on your video card to be sure it's clean and running well.

 

About games and computer temps when I was testing a game it would push my video card temps high enough for the card to shut down. That was a fault with the program which might be the source of your problem. Just some other thoughts for you :sparkle:

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I had wondered if it could have been my video card. Also, there's no fan on it. I'd read of people putting Arctic Silver on their graphics card. Is this a good idea? I think I've located mine- Should an integrated one have a small heatsink over it?

 

It seems that the longer I wait to try to use my computer again, the longer it stays on. I've been running it with the case open and the A/C right beside my desk blows on it indirectly. It gets pretty chilly where the computer is.

 

I remembered something that may be worth mentioning... I'm running Motherboard Monitor 5 to keep an eye on the temp. I noticed that the program also monitors the fans, the power supply and some other things. Well, just out of curiosity, I set the program to give me an alarm when the voltage does something it shouldn't. It gave me the alarm a few minutes later while running a couple load-heavy programs at once (Windows Media Player, a Firefox window and something else I don't recall). Unfortunately, in an inborn reaction, I closed the dialog box before I could read most of it. Should I be worried about this? :unsure:

Edited by tokaia
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Passive cooling on a video card is used to keep down the noise of fans in my personal opinion it's not a good idea. As to pulling off the heatsink and using Artic silver on a video card I've never done it so I can't recommend it.

 

Wish you had read the message on Motherboard monitor but since you didn't my guess would be that voltages dropped or surged. Personally I use Everest Home Edition which is free to check thing like temps, fan speed and power. If a power supply is weak/failing or inexpensive it might not be supplying enough power to the 12v plug that supports the processor. A power supply should provide power to all parts at not more than + or- 1.5% with the 12v plug it's better if it's over 12v rather than under since weak power will cause a motherboard failure.

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I can't get it to stay on long enough to do anything. It seems like the problem is getting worse. :cr@sh:

 

My fiance has a Dell (Dimension 4600) about the same age as my Compaq (Presario s3040se). Would it be safe to remove his power supply and try it in mine to see if the problem is fixed? Also, what is the function of that little red switch on the back of the machine by the power supply?

Edited by tokaia
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DON'T move that red switch!!! you'll blow the power supply if set wrong.

 

edit:- if your motherboard has onboard graphics remove your graphics card and see if it works then u'll know the problem is the graphics card i'd say everything is fine with that cpu and temps.

Edited by terry1966
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I have an integrated graphics/video card. Any way I can disable it without having to boot up the computer?

 

Should I need to replace my PSU, what is a good one $60 or less?

Edited by tokaia
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Wait are you saying you have on board video as well as a video card in a slot? If you do you have a conflict between the video sources. To disable or enable onboard video you need to go into the bios to turn it off or on.

 

Power supplies in Compaq are usually specific to Compaq computers so it very likely that the Dell power supply won't work in your system. Very likely you will need to order the power supply from HP/Compaq.

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No, I only have the one integrated one.

 

The next time my computer gives me problems, I'm getting a credit card and buying a new one. :cr@sh::cr@sh::cr@sh:

 

The PSU's brand is Hipro. Do I have to replace it with another Hipro? Why can't I use a different one?

Edited by tokaia
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If you have only on board video then where is the heatsink you were talking about being on the video card this is a bit confusing :geezer:

Compaq use purpose built power supplies for their systems in most cases which is why you would need to buy a Compaq power supply. Most major system builders are getting away from purpose built power supplies since they are a pain to replace. Your Compaq if it's one of the newer ones might have an ATX standard power supply but without being able to see your system it's all guess work.

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