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Question for theoldgardener


Juliet
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I've tried to send you a PM but, I'm either blocked or you have it set to receive no PM's.... something!

 

I recently planted some Caladiums <sp? bulbs and I have a question about this fall/winter.

Can I leave the bulbs in the containers and place in the garage or do I have to dig up the bulbs and keep them in a dry dark place?

The photo on the package were red verigated ones that were so pretty and I would hate to lose them.

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What USDA zone are the bulbs planted?

 

http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/ushzmap.html :)

 

 

Caladiums grow from corms and can be propagated by dividing the tubers. They are hardy only to USDA plant hardiness zone 10; in colder areas, they are typically grown as tender bulbs or as houseplants.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caladium

Edited by theoldgardener
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The hardiness zone map for Tenn. varies from one end of the state to the other, and the caladiums are native to zone 10 --- Naples Florida area.

Treat them as a tender bulb and you will do just fine.

 

# Caladium Lift caladium plants before frost and allow them to dry in a warm spot. Cut back the foliage after it dies. Caldium bulbs don't like to be stored in cold temperatures. Keep at 50 - 60 degrees F. Pack loosely in peat moss. Repot up in early Spring, about 2 inches deep, knobby side up. Keep the soil moist and warm - 75 - 80 degres F. Move outdoors after all danger of frost.

 

 

http://gardening.about.com/od/floweringbul...toringBulbs.htm

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Soil can be amended to grow most anything well. Hostas are a shade plant that will tollerate sun if the roots are moist. My friend Mick has 582 varieties and over a thousand plants growing in a sandy soil. He amends with manure every year and waters (automatically) every morning.

One of our favorite hosta sellers and propagators is Bob Solberg of Chapel Hill, NC. He has bred a hosta with red stems that really looks nice. He had one at hosta college this past March and promises to have it with red leaf veins by next year. It will be a good seller. http://www.hostahosta.com/

Hosta College is great because all the regional growers come and give classes and show the new hostas being developed. http://ihostohio.org/Portal/glhc/college.asp

Our garden club recently had Jeff Ball as a speaker and he talked about soil. It has been found that the best way to get good soil is to cover the bad soil with manure or other humus producing stuff and just leave it set over the winter. The microbes and worms will turn it into just what is needed for a good garden -- all for free.

http://gardeneryardener.blogspot.com/2007/...lousy-soil.html

 

:)

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Well, some compost and pine mulch mixed in with a tiller will make it good dirt

Well caintry, I would be the tiller and I ain't gas powered or electric...a small area I could try.

 

TOG, hosta's are beautiful, when out driving I see homes with hostas and just envy.

I could drive out to the stables and collect a good supply of manure if I could find me a good bucket and lid.

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I use horse manure and they are fed pellets and use sawdust and wood shavings as bedding. That way I don't get the weed and other seeds found in baled straw. I get it by the pick up load. Horse manure is safe to use in its first year on non-food crops.

You can use a cardboard box with a plastic trash bag as a liner to haul loose materials in an automobile. The boxes from party stores that were previously used for glass whiskey bottles are the strongest boxes and hold up well as long as they are kept dry.

 

:)

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Thanks TOG thats a good idea....may have to use it.

 

Jacee, the photos on that site were so pretty!...I think my bulbs are one of the reds..I hope.

Edited by Juliet
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