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  • 2 weeks later...

I find the scores interesting. I personally take the "disclaimer" to heart, though. This score is not an actual benchmark of anything, really.

 

So many variables will change your score. Things like what type of anti-virus program you run, what type of internet connection you have, how close you are to the pc-pitstop servers, etc.

 

Someone above was asking about vid-card performance. Bottom line here is install the latest drivers for the 8800 directly from the Nvidia web-site.

 

I work directly with the gaming world for online FPS games such as COD4, Enemy Territory and others. One of the many things I do is help others "tweak" their systems to provide stable fps, vs hitting some sort of wierd-maximum, with fluctiations. FPS in-game is better if it's stable, rather than all over the board.

 

Getting performance in real-time, from your system comes in two main groups. One is keeping it up-to-date with drivers for your hardware(with exceptions, I might add) and two is tweaking programs to work better. Those are things the pc-pitstop scans will not check, and never can. They're up to you to do the research on.

 

I see tons of ppl over-clocking to gain "performance" as well, and while some do, most do not due to poor cooling. Heat increases will actually cause a performance-reduction in "real-world" situations, but will increase your score on pc-pitstop. Is there a point to that? YES! Notice I mentioned "real-world" situations.

 

The "pit-tests" will not push your vid-card into working to hard, they only test 2D. Try OC'ing it in COD4 or Crysis,with all the eye-candy turned on and see how loud that fan screams on air-cooling, and watch your fps drop like someone just tossed you into the ocean with a pair of cement shoes. That's a "real-world" situation. Performance will actually drop, rather than increase. The same can apply to your processor, if it heats up to much. Would your rather experience temps of 40 degrees Celcius while gaming, at stock speeds? Or temps of 75 degrees Celcius at stock speeds? Can I tell you which works better? Definitely. I've tested my Q6600 in COD4 right up to speeds of 3Ghz with no issues for stability, but in-game performance takes a huge hit for fps and on-line lag/connection issues. Why? Simple.....to much heat, and the temps only rose a mere 12 degrees from my stock temps of 32 degrees Celcius. Not something I'd consider to hot for a processor. I've also clocked my 8800GT up, and stock it's already OC'd to begin with. Didn't gain any real-world performance there either, within a certain limit. OC-clock speeds are mainly for bragging rights, and do little else.

 

Rule of thumb, work with gaining a little(within the range of finding an actual improvement in performance) and be happy with it. If you get greedy, you'll find the opposite to be true. You end up with a degredation in performance, as well as system instability.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

so true, high temps destroy performance.

 

I have been building computers for 15 years and I always install a better cooling system than the current hardware requires. With new quad processors and and the latest graphic cards, fans are fast becomming outdated. I now install water cooling in all gaming systems I build and recomend it to anyone wanting to OC their systems.

 

As far as OCing goes their is definatly performance to be gained. And yes I see fps increases due to oc.

It may not be a large increase but going from 15fps to 20 is huge when you talk about playability.

 

As far as benchmarks go I prefer to use 3DMARK06 to test my OCed systems. For instance, a Q6600 system

I just built had a stock 3dmark score of just over 10,000. OCed to 3.2 got a score of over 13,500.

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so true, high temps destroy performance.

High Vcore Voltage also reduce performance or damages the CPU. I'm sure you already know anyway since you have 15 years of experience.

 

I have been building computers for 15 years and I always install a better cooling system than the current hardware requires. With new quad processors and and the latest graphic cards, fans are fast becomming outdated. I now install water cooling in all gaming systems I build and recomend it to anyone wanting to OC their systems.

I agree especially on Quads but not always because there is some Air Cooling out there that does a great job cooling Quads like the Thermalright. My E6300 is massively overclocked to 3.3GHz with the Temperature of 46C Idle using Artic Freezer Pro 7 and Real Temp Program (Outside Temp. 80,and Room Temp 75). It runs stable at 1.35V. Oh and wait, Quad-Core runs Hell. I don't think I should talk about my Dual-Core Processor then. :(

 

As far as OCing goes their is definatly performance to be gained. And yes I see fps increases due to oc.

It may not be a large increase but going from 15fps to 20 is huge when you talk about playability.

Correct.

 

As far as benchmarks go I prefer to use 3DMARK06 to test my OCed systems. For instance, a Q6600 system

I just built had a stock 3dmark score of just over 10,000. OCed to 3.2 got a score of over 13,500.

3DMark 06 is a great example for Benchmarking and PCPitstop is just to give you an idea where your system would look at. I would kind of consider PCPitstop on Benchmarking for CPU, Memory and Disk Speed. They all seem to be accurate comparing to most Benchmarks.

Edited by Conceal
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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...
Guest dwfinch

I'm in!!! Made it by 1 point! 7001, with very small OC and a little memory tweak. No over voltage! :clap:

 

But it proved to be unstable, I think my memory timings are to tight. So back to the 6000 club I go.

Edited by dwfinch
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