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Disable UAC in Vista


Astroman
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If you're like me, I found the UAC (User Account Control) very annoying. I know it's for security, but if you know what you are doing, you most likely should not have a problem with any threats.

To shut the UAC off, there are a few ways to go about doing it,

 

The Non registry way is to click on start(or whatever you want to call it)

control panel,

(under user accounts and family safety) click on "Add remove User Accounts"

near the bottom click on "Turn User Account Control On or Off"

Uncheck the box "Use User Account Control to (UAC) to help protect your computer

hit ok and reboot

the Security Center will notice that it is shut off, just open it up, and tell it to ignore it.

 

View site below for detailed instructions, and other ways to go about shutting it off

 

*source*

http://www.petri.co.il/disable_uac_in_windows_vista.htm

Edited by Astroman
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If you're like me, I found the UAC (User Account Control) very annoying. I know it's for security, but if you know what you are doing, you most likely should not have a problem with any threats.

To shut the UAC off, there are a few ways to go about doing it,

 

 

Virus software companies. Spyware/malware software companies. Just love folks like you, tis folks like you who keep them in business.

 

I actually made it so UAC required a password and couldn't simply be batted out of the way.

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  • 2 months later...

Virus software companies. Spyware/malware software companies. Just love folks like you, tis folks like you who keep them in business.

Really? So just how does UAC protect you? You still have to "Allow or Not Allow" it yourself (second guess) anyway, just like the guy in your avatar.

 

I think it's enough that McAfee is doing the same thing. IMHO UAC is redundant and on top of that, a PITA .

 

I actually made it so UAC required a password and couldn't simply be batted out of the way.

I actually made it so that I run Spyware/malware software, don't you? If there is a convincing argument for UAC, I don't know what it is. :unsure:

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You still have to "Allow or Not Allow" it yourself (second guess) anyway, just like the guy in your avatar.

 

 

The thing is, however, most people are going to simply press the continue button just to get it out of the way, without even reading what exactly is actually attempting to run. I have enabled my Administrator account, given it a password, and changed my everyday account to Standard User. That way, I now have to enter a password before continuing, and in turn actually read what's about to happen. Believe it or not, the UAC pops up far less frequently now than it did before. I actually don't require Administrator privileges for most of the everyday tasks that I perform on the computer anyway, so I don't need to be an Administrator 90% of the time.

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  • 1 month later...

yes, but it's been quite a while. however, my kids sure did have quite the knack for getting viruses and spyware on their (limited) user accounts. that is until i started using vista w/ uac and parental controls.

Edited by badbinary
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disabling UAC can cause other issues if you try to use the performance monitor

 

On a Windows Vista-based computer, you click the Resource Monitor button. Then, the Performance Monitor (Perfmon.exe) process may continuously start and stop. Additionally, Windows Vista may stop responding.

 

Note You click the Resource Monitor button to display the utilization details for the CPU, for memory, for the disk, and for the network.

Steps to reproduce the problem

• You log on to a Windows Vista-based computer by using an account that has administrator credentials.

• You disable the User Account Control (UAC) feature.

• You log on to the Windows Vista-based computer on which UAC has been disabled. Additionally, you use an account that does not have administrator credentials.

• On the Performance tab of the Windows Task Manager dialog box, you click the Resource Monitor button.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/937085 Edited by Joe C
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yes, but it's been quite a while. however, my kids sure did have quite the knack for getting viruses and spyware on their (limited) user accounts. that is until i started using vista w/ uac and parental controls.

 

No I haven't, never had anything more than a tracking cookie.

 

disabling UAC can cause other issues if you try to use the performance monitor

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/937085

 

And that link is for a hotfix for those that have that problem.

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