Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Minnie

1st grade Teacher - WOW

Recommended Posts

I too can count the days my son missed from school in his thirteen years there.

 

If it wasn't broken, bleeding, and he wasn't near death, then he went to school. Thats the way it was, no two ways about it. :geezer:

 

When he was old enough for a part time job (high school), if he wanted to stay home, I used to say if you are sick, we will go to the doctor, if the doctor says your fine, then you go to school and pay the doctor bill.

 

Skip a class, stay in the house for a week, skip a day, and stay in the house for a month. Lie to me about it, stay in the hospital for as long as it takes to recover from severe asswhoopin.

 

Nope, he didn't miss much school. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too can count the days my son missed from school in his thirteen years there.

 

If it wasn't broken, bleeding, and he wasn't near death, then he went to school. Thats the way it was, no two ways about it. :geezer:

 

When he was old enough for a part time job (high school), if he wanted to stay home, I used to say if you are sick, we will go to the doctor, if the doctor says your fine, then you go to school and pay the doctor bill.

 

Skip a class, stay in the house for a week, skip a day, and stay in the house for a month. Lie to me about it, stay in the hospital for as long as it takes to recover from severe asswhoopin.

 

Nope, he didn't miss much school. ;)

 

You might be related to my dad! :surrender:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not making a mountain out of a molehill, I’m not being a bad parent saying he should bring the cards to school, and I’m certainly not getting in the way of her job as a teacher. Now I am being ridiculed because I DO CARE as a parent? Please...

 

You need to READ what I have the problem with. It was the way she handled the situation, it is not acceptable to be treated like that and for the teaching I DO teach him to be reversed by someone that is 23 years old and on a power trip. Why should she not respect me and my child? Respect does go both ways.

 

Steven had them before school and was showing his little neighbor friend. He was not playing with the cards in class or being disruptive or disrespectful to her and he is a good student.

 

I did not react and call her up on the phone and cuss her out (I would have liked to) :laughing: , I did not write her back and tell her off (I had to remember I am not a child) :laughing: . I am certainly not going to IGNORE anything and let it go. Honestly it's the parents that don't give a crap what happens to their children and don't stick up for them and just let stuff go that they end up delinquents (sp) or in trouble. I am going to talk with her at parent teacher conference and let her know this is a 1st grade class and a warning or a conversation would be more appropriate than a letter like that.

 

mem23 - You are completely off base I think you need to skip out on commenting in this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Minnie you also need to bear in mind that your child is the one in school not you.

If the teacher starts to resent your reaction it wont be you that is in the firing line.

Teachers don't easily forget parents that give them a hard time and it is very easy for a teacher to disadvantage a child in small ways.

You may win a minor battle, but you could be setting the teacher up for a course of resentment toward your child.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not making a mountain out of a molehill, I’m not being a bad parent saying he should bring the cards to school, and I’m certainly not getting in the way of her job as a teacher. Now I am being ridiculed because I DO CARE as a parent? Please...

 

You need to READ what I have the problem with. It was the way she handled the situation, it is not acceptable to be treated like that and for the teaching I DO teach him to be reversed by someone that is 23 years old and on a power trip. Why should she not respect me and my child? Respect does go both ways.

 

Steven had them before school and was showing his little neighbor friend. He was not playing with the cards in class or being disruptive or disrespectful to her and he is a good student.

 

I did not react and call her up on the phone and cuss her out (I would have liked to) :laughing: , I did not write her back and tell her off (I had to remember I am not a child) :laughing: . I am certainly not going to IGNORE anything and let it go. Honestly it's the parents that don't give a crap what happens to their children and don't stick up for them and just let stuff go that they end up delinquents (sp) or in trouble. I am going to talk with her at parent teacher conference and let her know this is a 1st grade class and a warning or a conversation would be more appropriate than a letter like that.

 

mem23 - You are completely off base I think you need to skip out on commenting in this thread.

 

You know, when I was in school the children made their own clothing, the teachers beat us with metal sticks, we walked to and from school up hill both ways in 10 feet of snow with no shoes on. :laughing: . I don't know where some people get this crap, just because they did some rotten :filtered: to you back in the they day and you turned out "alright" (by someones accord), doesn't mean it is acceptable and kids today should have to end up miserable like them. I stand behind you on this one Minnie; all taking the cards away from your son will teach him is resentment, especially if there wasn't a good explaination why. People may say that the life is unfair, it isn't even close to that though; if someone pulled that crap on me in the "real world" they'd catch some of my knuckle in their mouth. Stick behind your son on this one Mindy, you are right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(Salo35)

 

You know, when I was in school the children made their own clothing, the teachers beat us with metal sticks, we walked to and from school up hill both ways in 10 feet of snow with no shoes on. . I don't know where some people get this crap, just because they did some rotten :filtered: to you back in the they day and you turned out "alright" (by someones accord), doesn't mean it is acceptable and kids today should have to end up miserable like them. I stand behind you on this one Minnie; all taking the cards away from your son will teach him is resentment, especially if there wasn't a good explaination why. People may say that the life is unfair, it isn't even close to that though; if someone pulled that crap on me in the "real world" they'd catch some of my knuckle in their mouth. Stick behind your son on this one Mindy, you are right.

Aw diddums - did someone say something to disagree with your thoughts? :nono:

 

Come off it Salo and all the rest of you who are defending this angry parent and her childs problem with a teacher who tried - no in fact likely did - enforce a school rule. This isn't really about how the situation was handled is it - seems to be more about the note Min got. Schools over here normally do this if they think the item/s may cause a distraction in class. They even have the right to keep them to the end of the school year if they think it warrants it :hammer:

 

Because you have had some comments from us OLDER folks about how we were dealt with in school Salo, doesn't give you the right to poke fun at our experiences - in the same way that it doesn't give folks the right to poke fun at someone's spelling, for the simple reason that this site says we have to SHOW RESPECT FOR EACH OTHER! (Caps intended). You seem to forget that the education you so blithely take for granted is something far, far greater than many of us OLDER folks ever had a chance to get - but we didn't knock it - nor those trying to teach us - and we seem to have done pretty damn good out of it :geezer:

 

Respect - well we've seen a lot of it (NOT) from the younger ones posting in here and I think that sucks. You are all so busy ranting about the teacher's lack of respect and how much that is a bad example for the kid and so on. Believe me when I say that after nearly thirty years of working with difficult kids in a special school professionally as a social worker in secondary education (High school); the majority of those that managed to get on with their lives and have since become good, honest and respectable parents themselves, were the ones who listened and took on board the fact that teachers and ancillary staff were not in fact against them but were trying to help them move on with their lives and make the best of it. How did they do it? By really considering the respect they were being given as well as the responsibility to give more respect in return.

Now for a first grade kid - that aint so easy Min; the world is still a strange place to them and the rules aren't always too clear to them either. But I'm sure of one thing - I don't think he will be tempted to take good stuff like his cards to school again. For yourself - I can understand the anger or annoyance that you feel by the way this teacher has dealt with the situation and the word "fairness" springs to mind. She dealt with it in its immediacy and I think the wording of her reply to your note was perhaps rushed - but hey - c'mon, you can't go getting all het up about everything like that - you'll be a nervous wreck by the time he is 16 :blink: I think you should make an appointment to see her sooner rather than later. Be calm when you do meet her and make this item the last thing on your agenda. You could broach the subject after finding out how your son is doing in class, :shifty: by saying something like...."by the way, those card you confiscated from him earlier in the year, I thank you for that because it will remind him not to bring things like that to school again (you will have her on your side now). Then tell her -nicely- that whilst you appreciated that, you were wanting to check with her if she really meant the point about keeping them for good in future? If she says yes - then (nicely) tell her if that were to happen, then you would have to take the matter up with the principal because - in your opinion - that would be tantamount to theft - and you don't really think she would want it to all get out of hand like that - would she?

 

I do hope sincerely, that you get a good ending out of this - boy oh boy, being a parent aint easy :lol:

 

beau B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You seem to forget that the education you so blithely take for granted is something far, far greater than many of us OLDER folks ever had a chance to get - but we didn't knock it

I do apologize if I offended you, my intention wasn't to insult; however your personal assumption about me doesn't leave me with a warm fuzzy feeling either, I finished high school with 145 credits (145% of that required to get my diploma), I received academic honors for my acheivements, I received 97% in my Math class and I received several scholarships for my academic acheivements. I assure you I do not take my education for granted; with that being said, I owe you nothing for my success and I will not pretend I do.

 

Come off it Salo

Why should I come off it? It is my opinion that Mindy should ensure that her son's teacher has some respect for personal property, and that matters should be dealt with in a proper manner. I agree that children shouldn't be allowed to play games during class, it is distracting to them, other students and often the teacher...with that being said these matters have to be dealt with in a certain manner; especially with a young child in grade one.

 

I don't want to rag on you Mr Beaujangles, but you single out young members for lacking respect in their posts; yet in your post you managed to question my integrity without any regard for how that would make me feel. In my defence, when I posted it was general and not intended to be malicious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is important to teach one's children to resolve their own problems and fight their own battles. Small problems offer an excellent opportunity to teach children how to negotiate and/or question authority in a civil manner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is important to teach one's children to resolve their own problems and fight their own battles. Small problems offer an excellent opportunity to teach children how to negotiate and/or question authority in a civil manner.

 

If the kid was in grade five I'd certainly agree, but this is grade one were talking about

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SALO35 Sept 16 7:48pm

 

You know, when I was in school the children made their own clothing, the teachers beat us with metal sticks, we walked to and from school up hill both ways in 10 feet of snow with no shoes on. . I don't know where some people get this crap, just because they did some rotten :filtered: to you back in the they day and you turned out "alright" (by someones accord), doesn't mean it is acceptable and kids today should have to end up miserable like them.

Salo - the point I was trying to draw you to was about the above part of your post. I'm not really sure where you were going with it or coming from. Your comment implies that older folks had a miserable time in school and that from somewhere (?) you seem to have gained the impression it is all a load of crap - told to you by god knows who. My own schooling was pretty good but it didn't have all the great technology etc that schools nowadays seem to have - but we still managed to come out with certificates and a fairly good grounding to launch us on the life beyond school!

 

Salo 35 today 2:41am

I do apologize if I offended you, my intention wasn't to insult; however your personal assumption about me doesn't leave me with a warm fuzzy feeling either

Salo - there is no need for you to apologise at all - we are only having a discussion - I do not judge you in any way at all - nor do I make any assumptions about you - I was merely responding to what you wrote. However, I do respect and admire you for the offer :clap:

 

Salo 35 - time as above

 

I don't want to rag on you Mr Beaujangles, but you single out young members for lacking respect in their posts; yet in your post you managed to question my integrity without any regard for how that would make me feel. In my defence, when I posted it was general and not intended to be malicious

Nah - I wasn't singling out young people. I was responding to the younger posters on here who quite likely with the best intention - were perhaps not helping Min to deal with this in a way that would necessarily help her young son or herself in this situation. One of the other posters pointed out the fact this boy has the rest of his schooling to go through and it wouldn't help to set off on the wrong foot by Mom burning the ears off the teacher. I never for one moment even considered your post as being malicious.

 

As regards your own academic achievements - great! And well done to you for the work you put into achieving them.

 

Salo 35 - time as above

I agree that children shouldn't be allowed to play games during class, it is distracting to them, other students and often the teacher...with that being said these matters have to be dealt with in a certain manner; especially with a young child in grade one.

And there is the nub of both our posts - we do agree on this. I think the part where we are all diverging - is on the how it is dealt with and in what manner.

 

 

Salo - hope this helps?

 

beau B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Salo - the point I was trying to draw you to was about the above part of your post. I'm not really sure where you were going with it or coming from. Your comment implies that older folks had a miserable time in school and that from somewhere (?) you seem to have gained the impression it is all a load of crap - told to you by god knows who. My own schooling was pretty good but it didn't have all the great technology etc that schools nowadays seem to have - but we still managed to come out with certificates and a fairly good grounding to launch us on the life beyond school!

Salo - there is no need for you to apologise at all - we are only having a discussion - I do not judge you in any way at all - nor do I make any assumptions about you - I was merely responding to what you wrote. However, I do respect and admire you for the offer :clap:

Nah - I wasn't singling out young people. I was responding to the younger posters on here who quite likely with the best intention - were perhaps not helping Min to deal with this in a way that would necessarily help her young son or herself in this situation. One of the other posters pointed out the fact this boy has the rest of his schooling to go through and it wouldn't help to set off on the wrong foot by Mom burning the ears off the teacher. I never for one moment even considered your post as being malicious.

 

As regards your own academic achievements - great! And well done to you for the work you put into achieving them.

And there is the nub of both our posts - we do agree on this. I think the part where we are all diverging - is on the how it is dealt with and in what manner.

Salo - hope this helps?

 

beau B)

 

I could never stay mad at you :), were all good; just slightly different opinions, thats all good though (but mine is right :P , just bugging)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is important to teach one's children to resolve their own problems and fight their own battles. Small problems offer an excellent opportunity to teach children how to negotiate and/or question authority in a civil manner.

 

You are going to teach your kid to go Che Guevara over some Yu Gi Oh cards at the age of six? At six kids still have a hard time communicating their wants and needs, I doubt that there would be too many six year olds that would stand up to a teacher over something like this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My youngest kid is lucky enough to teach in a primary magnet school; he loves the work and the kids. My sister-in-law teaches English Lit. in a local high school; her life is a hell on earth -- she catches it from the kids she tries to teach (no "harsh" discipline allowed) and from the weenie admin's who won't support her.

 

The difference is the parents. In the magnet school, you can't find parking space on program/PTA meeting nights. At the other school, the parents could care less; teachers are tax-supported baby-sitters, and the so-called parents' attitude is, in the words of the song, "Don't bring me no bad news".

 

I know I'm preaching to the choir, here. The fact that you guys take the time to post and to argue shows that you DO give a damn, and, regardless of your points of view, your kids will probably do OK.

 

The schools need input from the parents, to supply encouragement and recognition for work well done, and to hold feet to the fire to keep 'em honest!

 

Decent pay couldn't hurt, either....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are going to teach your kid to go Che Guevara over some Yu Gi Oh cards at the age of six? At six kids still have a hard time communicating their wants and needs, I doubt that there would be too many six year olds that would stand up to a teacher over something like this.

 

Of course not--please understand, "fight their own battles" is a figure of speech. But in the case of a very young child, I would choose to discuss the matter with him first to ensure that he understands the necessity of following apropriate rules, of apologizing for infractions, and of maintaining a "civil tongue" while appealing to authority. And, six is too late to begin these lessons.

 

We must have the courage to allow our children to make mistakes, and we must teach them how to deal with their mistakes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My youngest kid is lucky enough to teach in a primary magnet school; he loves the work and the kids. My sister-in-law teaches English Lit. in a local high school; her life is a hell on earth -- she catches it from the kids she tries to teach (no "harsh" discipline allowed) and from the weenie admin's who won't support her.

 

The difference is the parents. In the magnet school, you can't find parking space on program/PTA meeting nights. At the other school, the parents could care less; teachers are tax-supported baby-sitters, and the so-called parents' attitude is, in the words of the song, "Don't bring me no bad news".

 

I know I'm preaching to the choir, here. The fact that you guys take the time to post and to argue shows that you DO give a damn, and, regardless of your points of view, your kids will probably do OK.

 

The schools need input from the parents, to supply encouragement and recognition for work well done, and to hold feet to the fire to keep 'em honest!

 

Decent pay couldn't hurt, either....

 

sorry for me asking; but what is a magnet school?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry for me asking; but what is a magnet school?

 

In the U.S. system of education, a magnet school is a public school that draws students interested in specific subjects such as academics or the arts, from the surrounding region (typically a school district or a county or region-wide group of school districts).

Magnet_school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...