Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
chengrob

G-Boomers

Recommended Posts

I was born in 1959, which puts me at the tail end of a trend called the Baby Boom. I'm a Baby Boomer. I remember long hair, Jimi Hendrix, LSD, bell bottoms, and Kent State as a rebellious youth. Maturity and greed replaced our wayward spirit; and with it came junk bonds, the personal computer, compact discs, IRA's and the internet. We, Baby Boomers, have impacted, changed, and molded American society like no other generation before or after. Until now.

 

There is a new generation of young people that are going to rock the staid and complacent computer industry. For lack of a better name, let's call them Google Boomers, or G-Boomers for short. G-Boomers learned to use a mouse before they could write with a pencil. They setup their first G-Mail account before the age of 10.

 

At times, it seems like Google's long term prospects are hinged on this new generation of internet savvy kids and teens. Since the beginning of the year, Google has introduced an online word processor, spreadsheet, and calendar. All of them are free which is important since most 12 year olds don't have a lot of money. By any objective comparison, these products are simply inadequate to take on Thunderbird, Excel, and Word. I'm certainly not dropping Microsoft Office for these free feature replete products. But they should work great for a 12 year old opening an attachment in G-Mail.

 

Google is leading an internet centric world. There are numerous advantages to Google's new world.

 

1. Better Software Management. Since the software resides on a centralized server, each time you run the software, you get the latest version. In Google's case, it is a simple matter to add the missing features to their spreadsheet and word processor. And you know they will.

2. Data Reliability. You'll never lose your spreadsheets, letters, and emails due to a hard drive crash ever again. Here's a news flash. All hard drives eventually crash. Yours is no exception.

3. Data Sharing. Have you ever sent out a spreadsheet as an email attachment multiple times just because you made a few changes? Never again.

4. Universal Access. You don't need to be at your PC to look at your stuff. You can be anywhere.

 

G-Boomers don't spend a lot of money, yet. However, in the next 10 years, G-Boomers will graduate from college and get their first jobs, and then the G-Revolution will begin. This will be the first generation of totally internet-smart shoppers. They will search and research their purchases like never before. They will be the most informed buyers ever. And the internet search business will explode and of course, Google will be in the middle of the explosion.

Got a comment or response about this article? Join the conversation at the Pit.

 

The story doesn't end with Google. G-Boomers will be storing their spreadsheets, photos, documents online on centralized servers. The data will be accessable from any PC with an internet connection. It does not matter if the PC is a Mac, Gateway, Dell, or a no name Red Hat Linux box. Google is creating a whole generation of PC agnostics. First and foremost they will be operating system agnostic. It will not matter whether they are running Linux, Windows or OS 20. This will be great news because we will finally have true competition between the operating systems companies, which will dramatically drop the cost of computing.

 

G-Boomers will also have figured out the PC industry's best kept secret. AMD is just as reliable and fast as Intel processors. As G-Boomers become IT managers in major corporations, AMD will finally make some headway into the large and profitable corporate market. When Intel can no longer take the corporate market for granted, we will see true price competition for processors. Frankly, I can't wait to see processor prices tumbling down.

 

G-Boomers will see less and less value in hard drives, since all of their key information will be stored somewhere in cyberspace. Large and big honking processors will become increasingly important in the burgeoning server market, but the PCs of G-Boomers will be small, inexpensive, reliable, and quiet. Their portables will get incredible battery life. This ain't your grandfather's PC!

 

Have you ever heard of SaaS (software as a service)? You will. G-Boomers will change the entire software industry. They will no longer pay for software per se, but they will pay for what they want to accomplish. There is a whole nacent industry of software companies waiting for the G-Boomers to grow up. At PC Pitstop, we just said goodbye to Quickbooks, and hello to NetSuite for our financial management. NetSuite is an SaaS company.

 

G-Boomers all have an ipod, and in many cases, more than one. When a G-Boomer buys a CD, the first thing they do is rip it, then listen to it. Buy - Rip - Listen. They love iTunes and allofmp3.com because they feel like they are wasting time ripping CD's. G-Boomers love Apple and think that the music labels are stuck in the 20th century.

 

Last week, I was sitting in a product meeting with a computer company whose name coincidentally begins with the letter G. When asked how he felt the PC industry would evolve in the next 10 years, this senior product manager responded, "We see little to no change in the next 10 years." Clearly, he needs to sit down and chat with a G-Boomer.

 

Enough Said,

 

Rob

 

 

Full Article:

http://www.pcpitstop.com/news/rob/rcheng0607.asp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I dread the day when SaaS is the norm, it isn't difficult to see all the problems and headaches associated with it.

 

Young college student relies on it for all his/her work and data storage. They loose that part time job they had, and can no longer pay for said service, all of a sudden all their work, data and school papers become inaccessible to them. In short they simply can not afford to pay the monthly ransom fee to get what used to be theirs.

 

Why bother, there are free applications and cheap things called CD/RW to store the data and school work on. The best part? at pennies per CD, and free software, the data is always accessible, remains free, and there are no monthly bills to have to worry about.

 

I know Microsoft and others see renting software online as the future, but personally I think it will be a miserable failure, but before it fails it will have caused grief for thousands and thousands of people.

 

You already see it all the time, people are constantly asking for and looking for freeware, opensource, and free alternatives to services and applications that try and milk that last few cents from people who already are paying too much for internet access, web hosting, image hosting, email...........the last thing we need is a rent as you go software base that seeks to take away the freedom we have over our data.

 

The minute you store it on a pay as you go service you have given away the control of your data to someone who does not have your interests in mind, and could care less about your data. Miss a payment and you will quickly realize who owns the data.

 

I would consider this the blackmail scheme of the future.

 

They hold your data ransom, you can't do a damn thing about it, either pay up, or loose it all.

 

No thanks, I personally want nothing to do with such money grubbing schemes.

Edited by Bruce

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very convincing post, Bruce. I know you've seen it coming for a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't just burning a cd in addition to using SaaS kinda stop the ransom thing. There's been a few time where I've lost info before being able to burn a CD for my QuickBooks info. Saas would have been a help. No one killed all the horses just because cars came along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And now you have a CD of data made with a proprietary application from a rent me software company that is not in a open format and can only be used with the rent me software, what do you do with that data?

 

Why pay an online service for something you can do locally on your computer for free, and with no fear of loosing your info to the kidnappers?

 

Baffles me why anyone would fall for such a blackmail scheme.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bruce,

 

I had not thought of your point of view. Almost all of these programs have some sort of export feature so if you need to get the data out, then you can.

 

I believe that a lot of the SaaS stuff will be free. Such as Google and Yahoo have already done with mail. There will also be pay stuff also. Some of it is not free. For example, most online banking applications are this way right now. Perhaps the issue is semantics, because my key point is that SaaS is browser and operating system agnostic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that many have free services, I wouldn't use them for anything important anyways. My point is not the free services. I do not consider these to be what the industry is looking at as the future of SaaS. Nor does the industry.

 

They view the future of SaaS as the ransom scheme. The free offerings are the bait to suck you in.

 

Export features are fine and dandy, if the files that are exported can be used in something else, however such is not always the case.

 

Of course then there is the most common case, where people don't use the export features, they discover they missed a payment, and can't do a thing until they pony up the money to get access again. :yucky:

Edited by Bruce

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Along some of the same lines as Bruce's comments security security security :geezer: What a great target for hackers all that juicy information will make it a target that will be irresistible for eveybody from script kiddies to serious hackers. Guess I'm showing my age but when I'm one of billions my chances of being hacked is slim to none while if I'm in a single pool with thousands of others I'm a marked target :laughing:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would it be any more hackable than the current banking and credit situation? That certainly isn't the most secure either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do a lot of stuff with my computer Shogan. One thing I will never do online with it is banking. I used to, but haven't for several years now. I just don't trust the security they offer any more.

 

Perfect example........I have received two letters from the VA now, over the theft of my information. I don't need to be getting those letters from banks also.

 

Unfortunately, I used to do much more online then I do today. I simply do not trust others to secure my information and data for me. I sign up for nothing that requires personal information.

 

I personally feel I am much more qualified to keep my personal data and information secure then a 12 buck an hour bozo working at some basement IT department.

Edited by Bruce

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do a lot of stuff with my computer Shogan. One thing I will never do online with it is banking. I used to, but haven't for several years now. I just don't trust the security they offer any more.

 

Perfect example........I have received two letters from the VA now, over the theft of my information. I don't need to be getting those letters from banks also.

 

Unfortunately, I used to do much more online then I do today. I simply do not trust others to secure my information and data for me. I sign up for nothing that requires personal information.

 

I personally feel I am much more qualified to keep my personal data and information secure then a 12 buck an hour bozo working at some basement IT department.

 

I got one email from the VA and it is legit. I just took it as a little strange that the paper letter arrived before the email did. I don't know why they are sending the email when it could be taken as a phishing attempt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Bruce on this one. It may be a good idea on paper, but the security issues and pay-per-use are questionable.

 

There are already so many programs that can do all of what Saas companies are offering. Some of the programs bundle together spreadsheets, word processing, etc, like MS Works. And if the user wants the info seperate from the computer, there are alternatives like CD's and external storage devices such as Zip drives and external hard drives. Understandable that the initial cost of the programs and storage devices can be a bit high, but having that kind of security over a person's info out in cyberspace versus the info being literally at the person's fingertips pays for itself.

 

I may be on the old fashioned side when it comes to security, but I understand the value of security, especially when it comes to my personal information. When I heard about that person from the VA that lost the laptop with a lot of info on veterans, I became worried as well, cause my info could have been stolen. That kind of thing could happen with the Saas information. To me, information is only as secure as the weakest link.

 

The way I see it, the "G-boomer" generation will be too dependant on computers and technology. They will have a tough time with a variety of skills that us older generations see as being basic. I can imagine these kids going to the computer rather than a dictionary to look a word up, using a computer to do research rather than going to a library and reading the encyclopedia.

 

Agreed that school work is easier to get through nowadays than when I went through school. While I was in school, home computers, as we know them now, were just barely hitting the market. I still had to write out school papers by hand. It wasn't until I hit high school that I could type out a paper, but had a dot-matrix printer. Now, dot-matrix printers are considered dinosaurs. Spreadsheet programs back then were targeted towards corporations that had an accounting department. Now, accounting is usually outsourced to local companies. The high school I went to had 3 computers in one room that students could use. They were the old style Mac with two 5.25" floppy drives and a green/black monitor (the letters were green). Now they probably have 3 high speed computers with color monitors. And to think I graduated 15 years ago.

 

To think in the next 10 years, technology in schools and at home will be so much faster. Most homes being built in 10 years will probably be internet wired, where every room can hook up to the internet in some form. If not hard-wired, there will be a central room that handles all the internet and each computer is wired or wirelessed to the central room.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Encyclopaedias are not updated constantly. Everything might be factually true up to the publishing date, but anything after that date will be blank.

 

The problem with written word is that it cannot be easily changed once it's printed. A revision must be made to correct the factually incorrect statements, and even then you're not sure everybody is going to get the updated information, because not everybody buys the latest version of an encyclopaedia or dictionary on a regular basis.

 

I can imagine new houses will be designed with (and older houses will be updated to have) a little box out somewhere in the front yard for the Internet, like the gas and water meters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can imagine new houses will be designed with (and older houses will be updated to have) a little box out somewhere in the front yard for the Internet, like the gas and water meters.

 

First we would have to have gas and water meters :P

 

We have well water and use electricity.

 

There are no water meters, no gas meters.........those things do not exist in much of rural America.

 

We don't even have fire hydrants, after all how could we when there is no public water system, there isn't a single hydrant for miles and miles. Our foundation saving department does a fine job of saving foundations. The wood structures that sit on those foundations are almost invariably lost.

 

Cable, DSL, telephone and internet on the other hand is readily available, the connections are everywhere, houses are wired and connected just subscribe, plug in and have it. :lol:

Edited by Bruce

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back to the blog, very nice Rob! Unfortunately I see things headed much the way you have reported there. The sad part could in fact be what Bruce is saying, a big rip-off, and who ends up paying? The little guy like me/us. What can we do as concerned "netsters" do to prevent/help?

 

:blink:

 

 

 

BTW, Bruce I do have gas, LP to be exact and just the other day I took my "witching rods" out and played in the front yard. I found water right under my driveway (no, no water lines close) and in 3 different spots in the area. ;)

Edited by caintry_boy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very interesting debate.

 

SaaS is just one element of the new G-Boomers. Whether you think agree with SaaS or not, it is hard to argue that the new generation is not already using it heavily with Gmail and Yahoo Mail. More importantly, is that they will view the computer much differently than we do. This one thing will change the dynamics of the PC industry. All for the better, I might add.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Downtime with SaaS could be a worry.

 

Companies might become completely dependant on G-Word or G-Spreadsheet, so that when Google goes down, so does the company by extension.

 

It's sorta going back to the old way of everybody having a dumb terminal (but not so dumb either!), and all connecting to one central point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

again I have to appologies for my ignorance. Ive not heard of saas before so Ive got some reading to do.

From what Ive read so far am I right in thinking this is basically `pay-per-view, web-based software`? If so thats a terrible idea.

I guess from the post's already up that your files stay on-line, so you couldn't take a local copy even if you wanted to? again another bad idea.

 

Add to that the amount of down-time google has had recently (including g-mail)

 

 

Anyway, Im gonna have a read

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob is also talking about pc's with no hard drives and no viable means of backing the data up anyways, that of course in my opinion just makes the problem even a bigger one.

 

As for online apps, well they have been in existence for years now, like most things they started off free, and once they get enough Dependant people the bills start coming in :lol:

 

Not many survive after they make the transition from it was free but tommorrow you will have to pay. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First we would have to have gas and water meters :P

 

We have well water and use electricity.

 

There are no water meters, no gas meters.........those things do not exist in much of rural America.

 

We don't even have fire hydrants, after all how could we when there is no public water system, there isn't a single hydrant for miles and miles. Our foundation saving department does a fine job of saving foundations. The wood structures that sit on those foundations are almost invariably lost.

 

Cable, DSL, telephone and internet on the other hand is readily available, the connections are everywhere, houses are wired and connected just subscribe, plug in and have it. :lol:

 

 

Theres a LOT of this country that still operates like that. Its just to expensive to plumb rural America

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is one very good example of successful Saas applications. GMail and Yahoo Mail.

 

In this case, I am certain they will remain free because of the competition between Google, Yahoo and Microsoft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Google. Yes. Very good and all that....

 

But they are going in some bad directions.

 

By placing their toolbar etc into software installations by default they are creating a new kind of adware...that...gulp...is acceptable to most.

 

They are supported by ads. They are an advertising company by definition when you look at their source of revenue.

 

That being said...why are people so acceping of Google software on their PCs? Software that isn't needed at all...it's just popular.

 

Don't store anything of any importance on their servers or any others of their ilk, and don't use their software.

 

The open source world is prepared to be embraced......forget about the adware companies. Google has a great seach engine for general use. Use it if you like...use their other advanced searches as well.....but their software?

 

 

 

Open source...open source....open source.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only time I see advertising through GMail is when I have to use the web interface (which is rare). It's free POP3. It's all downloaded onto hard disk, and deleted off GMail's server.

If Google were to charge for POP access, I'd probably pay it. Why? When Hotmail offers basically the same thing?

 

That could be the basis for a very interesting question: Do you trust Google, or Microsoft with your data? Both, or neither?

 

Me, I have my name as an email address. Hotmail couldn't provide that. Also, I don't have to worry about having a mail server running at home if I were to have my own domain. As far as trusting Google over/or/and Microsoft with data...well it's easy to figure out neither are looking out for me...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is one very good example of successful Saas applications. GMail and Yahoo Mail.

 

In this case, I am certain they will remain free because of the competition between Google, Yahoo and Microsoft.

 

There well may be a "couple" examples of free services, however free isn't how the great majority of vendors and experts see the future of SaaS, most view it as a new way to rent them software.

 

A simple "what is SaaS" google serach reveals what most see saaS as being, most are inline of the rent me view that I percieve it as being.

 

http://www.b-eye-network.com/view/2913?jse...d=8417aae931842

 

http://www.itnews.com.au/newsstory.aspx?CIaNID=33805

 

http://news.yahoo.com/s/cmp/20060617/tc_cmp/189500129

 

http://www.idgworldexpo.com/live/99/media//news/CC426178

 

http://www.it-enquirer.com/main/ite/more/software_on_demand/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...