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zeno0771

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About zeno0771

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  • System Specifications:
    Intel Q6600 @3600 (400x9) 1.45v on water Gigabyte GA965P-DS3 rev 1.0 4 GB GeiL DDR2-800 XFX GeForce 7600GS 2x320 Seagate SATAII Fedora 8 x86_64
  1. D'oh! And all this time I've been running Super_Pi just as I downloaded it! You're right though, and I don't foresee any windoze users going to the trouble...I just ran Super Pi mod 1.5 in Wine and it added a healthy 5 seconds to my 1M time, and THAT ain't no fun... :Tumbleweed: which kind of emphasizes Bruce's point: Are we testing just the CPU or the system as a whole? I mean I know that Pi is supposed to be strictly for CPU but a CPU by itself isn't going to do much...
  2. But it shouldn't necessarily lock anyone out of a competition (of any sort). IIRC that's the original idea behind OCing in the first place: To show up trust-fund babies with know-how. It could be argued that it also resulted in Linux appearing on home desktops... Not true; telemetry mods in pro racing are strictly regulated, and even if you discount that, the hardware is strictly regulated (i.e. NASCAR's 358 cubic-inch boat-anchor mandate for all competitors despite the fact that none of them have ever or will ever make one that size for any other purpose). Actually, that doesn't sound like a bad idea: How about classes (so you don't have QX9860s competing with E6300 C2Ds)? Without trolling or being arrogant about it, I've always liked the idea that my US$260 OEM Quad can run within a second of a $1200 QX hot-off-the-presses, but in the interest of fairness... Well, if almost everyone is running the same 2 Asus boards and the same 2 types of RAM, what's the point? The trick is, with only one OS allowed, they have to be called hardware benchmarks, because a system is defined as both hardware and software; further, anyone who does testing for a living will tell you that to have an accurate comparison you need as few variables unaccounted for as possible. Unfortunately for the sterile world of the lab, the differences in scores are almost guaranteed to be because of the OS. HEEEEYYYYY, that gives me another idea...few years back I saw a thread that was basically an uptime contest (mainly *Nix players there, surprise-surprise)...I want to see a Windows XP uptime thread...How long can you keep your Redmond calculator going at a stretch before you have to reboot. Now THAT would be funny... In any event, most OCers are gamers, and that limits them (for now) to Windows; it's only fair that they would want to know how similar systems perform under similar (i.e. same OS) conditions. Incidentally, I wonder how many of those 8-second QXs out there can be considered stable?
  3. Old hot-rodding rule..."Speed costs; how fast do you want to go?" :overclocking: Seriously though, among all the other car-racing/PC modding analogies, one thing stays the same, and that's cash. Hot Rod and Car Craft each try every few years to come up with a "real street" competition (Hot Rod's is called the Pump-Gas Drags...unless they got rid of it already) and every time they do it ends up being a money-contest, no matter how many rules they come up with to make the cars qualify as street-legal. It's all in how you play the game, I guess...
  4. As far as why you "couldn't do this", it really depends on the forum; some just want to keep the playing field as level as possible, others just have a chip on their shoulder about Linux' perceived "unfair advantage". I've seen some people get downright childish about it, and in those cases I just let the kids have the sandbox to themselves. There's another hwbot forum I subscribe to where I was told I could post the score but it wouldn't be entered in their top 10 list because of something having to do with hwbot not accepting non-Windows software or something (my score would've been right between 2 C2D's running @ 4.7GHz+, and the rest were all QX Yorkies).What you propose actually sounds like a pretty good idea, if only from a baselining standpoint; some would split hairs over the validity of any comparison (especially windoze fanboys) but keeping any testing variables to a minimum is always a good idea if you want unbiased results. EDIT: What are you using for your sysinfo? Is that SUSE-specific?
  5. Um, well...that's some loud MHz you have there...you have a 1.3 sec lead on me and needed 1.3 GHz to do it... Yeah, I'm cool with a solid Top 5 spot til I get my Yorkie (after the price drop next year!!! )...I just got this Q a few weeks ago. I hear Gigabyte's G33M DS2R's are evil clockers but I won't have that for another month so yeah...
  6. Well, as of earlier today, I guess this is officially the only board that will allow a Linux score post; got an honorable mention (of sorts) at another one only to get denied by the mod. Oh well, at least I know I trumped the next highest score there by 2 seconds and they were running an E6850 jacked to 4.2 GHz, and needed 1.77 volts to do it. Thanks for not being Nazi about my OS, guys. Next up: Gigabyte DS2R and 2x2GB in a Microfly case, on water...
  7. Yep. Don't get me wrong, I'm not complaining about 3.6 with this setup. If I got greedy I could pull 2 GB out and get what, maybe another 200 MHz? Nah...this is an every-day machine, I'm good with it-
  8. I looked at the beginning of the thread, was there an older version I should have been using? Don't want to tee anyone off with only my 3rd post here Honestly, I was just happy to find more than one bench tool that ran on both Windoze and *Nix...Few forums let Linux boxes play (something about an "unfair advantage") and I can see if you don't run an X server and shut down anything that isn't being used you could seriously artificially lower your score but in the interest of fairness I run all my benches just as I would use my machine on a daily basis: Full GUI w/ Compiz (yes, the cube is cool) and an average of 200+ running processes. In fact I used 4 instances of Pi 32M to pronounce my rig stable at 3.6; after an hour of Prime on all 4 cores the temp on the hottest core started outrunning my w/c Fact is, though, I was running XP back when I first started OCing; I started learning Linux about the same time and there was something like an 11 second difference between the two (in the 1M test) with no hardware changes (sorry, this was 2+ years ago, don't have any screenies)
  9. Never mind that, how did you get 4.2 on your Q? My homebrew watercooling keeps a pretty good lid on temps (22C idle/36C load, with the hottest core hitting the mid-60s) but I gotta push almost the same volts I needed to keep my E6300 stable at 423x7. This thing's recently deveoped a case of vdroop-itis; ~1.45v in BIOS/1.46 indicated, and it goes down to 1.39 if I load more than 2 cores...4.2 GHz...man, I could drop into the 7's with that, easy... and this is with 4 GB RAM and an OEM chip!
  10. 10.744 seconds...don't know if Linux boxes can play in this forum (we have something called HardInfo that does the same thing as CPU-Z) but if it makes anyone feel any better I had a full desktop going complete with Compiz-Fusion and was web-browsing on my other monitor which I cropped out of the pic to save bandwidth. The other terminal window is my POV-ray score, the window in the background is HardInfo, and the bar on the far left is GKrellm (system monitor, like a cross between Speedfan and CPU-Z); like I said it's not technically CPU-Z (apologies to the mods) but if it wasn't legit I wouldn't have bothered posting in the first place.
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