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EssexBiker

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About EssexBiker

  • Rank
    Member
  • Birthday 05/01/1948

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Profile Information

  • Location
    Basildon, Essex, UK
  • Interests
    Messing around on my PC has been my main hobby since retiring 5 years ago. And although I am a 61-year old grandmother of five, I have taught myself how to use my PC and keep it properly maintained over the past 5 years. I have also fitted and installed extra RAM, a new HD, a new sound card and an internal DVD writer! So I think I do pretty well for an old fogie!

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  • System Specifications:
    HP Pavillion a6632uk, AMD Phenom 8550 Triple-Core, clock speed 32200 Mhz, 3gb RAM, NVIDIA GeForce 9500 GS Overdrive Test http://www.pcpitstop.com/betapit/sec.asp?conid=22264019&report=Summary
  • TechExpress Link:
    http://www.pcpitstop.com/techexpress.asp?id=C1G18W8R1HBSCLDK
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  1. Although PC Pitstop.com and [email protected] is on my list of safe domains/safe senders in Windows Live Mail, I have not received any PC Pitstop Newsletters since 14 Oct 2011? I just checked my PC Pitstop settings but could not find anything relating to opting in or out of newsletters? Please help because I hate missing out on all the discussions and tips they contain!
  2. Every PC user should create and keep a system repair disk handy! Another tip for just this kind of situation is to set and leave your first boot option in the BIOS to CD rom. This way, whenever you need to boot from a system repair disk or spyware removal disk, Windows will boot from the inserted CD without any keyboard input. However, I must admit that I still don't know how you would select a repair option from the menu without a keyboard or mouse? Note to self: it might be a good idea to research this in case it happens to me one day OK. I have instantly researched this problem and the best solution I have found is if you have aPS/2 port on your PC, try plugging in a PS/2 mouse and see if that works. If it does, you can then press F8 or whichever function key your PC uses to access repair options and the usethe PS/2 mouse to select a repair option. If you do not have a PS/2 port on your PC, these can be obtained for next to nothing on eBay or can be purchased from a local PC store if it is needed urgently. Then you would have to install the new PS/2 card, plug in your PS/2 mouse and press F8 or whatever to access your repair options
  3. Thanks for the tips Firekracker! I might give AMdeadlink a try, just to whittle out and try to replace any dead links But I find that going through my links manually encourages me to delete any I no longer need And when you save as many urls to your favorites as I do, an occasional purge really is essential!
  4. Daemonyx, sorry but that isn't different at all! But I apologise if I did not make myself clear. However, the fact is that unless you do store favorites in different folders, there would be no need to do any dropping and dragging to organise them, would there? Because without folders, the only way you could organise them would be to right click anywhere in your favorites list and choose "Sort by name"!
  5. Rather than simply printing webpages to xps, preserve all the links in that webpage by choosing Saving as...in the file menu in IE and saving them as Web Archive, single file .mht instead! I found this invaluable when I wanted to transfer all my watched items from one eBay account to another It's also a good way to back up your watched items lists, in case My eBay ever plays up just when you were hoping to bid on an item
  6. I am fully aware thank you that some so-called stable, final versions of programs also come with "as is" and "use at your own risk" warnings written in their terms. I am equally aware that you should always take sensible precautions when installing any program on your computer - like only installing programs from sources you trust and always creating a restore point before installing any new program! I sometimes even backup (export) my entire registry before installing some programs just to be on the safe side! And as soon as I get a new computer, I always gather and keep a note of the system information including my Windows key in a folder on my computer, which is then backed up to 2 external drives for future reference. I also keep my original installation disks safe, making copies of them so that the master is never damaged and create a working set of restore disks as well as a disk containing all my drivers, which are all then backed up to my 2 external drives! So I believe I know what I'm doing a lot better than most Paultx!
  7. Keeping your C drive lean and mean sounds like a good idea in principle. However, according to other articles I've read, installing programs on a partition other than the C drive is not recommended because programs installed on another partition will NOT show up in Control Panel > add/remove programs, so programs without their own uninstall or unwise.exe cannot be uninstalled correctly/completely! So if it is mostly the large data caches of programs like Google Earth and TomTomHome that you want to keep off your C drive, why not just use their built-in tools>options to change the default location of its data cache, Temp, and or Backup folders to a folder on your partiton instead? Also, anyone who still wishes to try installing programs to a partition other than C drive should note that they will probably have to reformat the partition before or immediately after doing a clean install of their operating system. Because a new installation of Windows will delete the old registry and replace it with a brand new one, so all references to the programs on the alternative drive will be lost and Windows will no longer be correctly configured to use these programs!
  8. The easiest way to organise your bookmarks (IE favorites) is by opening the Favorites folder in the right-hand pane and cutting and pasting or simply dragging items to the folder you wish to move them to rather than using IE's long winded Organise Favorties facility! You can also open your Favorites folder in Windows Explorer and move them around in there. But I prefer the first method as that way you can quickly click on saved links to check that they are still valid before you move them
  9. Wow, if this works it could be absolutely FANTASTIC! For it to take effect after doing a clean install of your OS, I presume you would have to navigate to the HKLM / Software / Microsoft / Windows NT / CurrentVersion / ProfileList again and enter the path to the user profile in the folder you previously saved to your data partition? Would you then have to restart the computer to have it change all Windows default settings to your personalised settings stored in user profile in the alternative location? And would doing this also make Windows move the locations of your documents, contacts, favorites etc to the new locations on your data partition, where you had moved them before you reformatted? If so, this would be a huge timesaver and one of the best tips I have read! So thank you very much for it.
  10. Creating a boot drive separate to the system drive without it causing problems somewhere down the line sounds a bit too difficult to me! But I always keep all of my data on a separate partition, if only so that periodically I can do a clean install of my operating system on the system drive without it affecting my data files! As for backups, having lost some data once when a drive failed on me, I have been a bit of a belt and braces fiend ever since! Because I use Windows backup to backup all my data to a slave drive weekly, I synchronise all my data to an external drive daily and I backup all my data (automatically as it changes) to an online backup service! I also keep a second external drive at my daughter's house, which I swap over every time I visit, so that my data is synchonised on both drives in case one of them fails! LOL.
  11. When I ran the C:\Windows\system32>defrag c: -b command fragmentation only seemed to be decreased by 1%: Invoking boot optimization on System (C:)... Pre-Defragmentation Report: Volume Information: Volume size = 52.60 GB Free space = 22.41 GB Total fragmented space = 2% Largest free space size = 19.45 GB Note: File fragments larger than 64MB are not included in the fragmentat ion statistics. The operation completed successfully. Post Defragmentation Report: Volume Information: Volume size = 52.60 GB Free space = 22.41 GB Total fragmented space = 1% Largest free space size = 33.97 MB Note: File fragments larger than 64MB are not included in the fragmentat ion statistics. So I ran the C:\Windows\system32>defrag c: -v -w but at the end it still said that file fragments larger than 64MB are not included in the fragmentat ion statistics However, fragmentation was still reduced to zero, which is excellent: Invoking defragmentation on System (C:)... Pre-Defragmentation Report: Volume Information: Volume size = 52.60 GB Cluster size = 4 KB Used space = 30.66 GB Free space = 21.94 GB Fragmentation: Total fragmented space = 1% Average fragments per file = 1.01 Movable files and folders = 144242 Unmovable files and folders = 53 Files: Fragmented files = 829 Total file fragments = 1495 Folders: Total folders = 22260 Fragmented folders = 13 Total folder fragments = 94 Free space: Free space count = 4438 Average free space size = 5.06 MB Largest free space size = 16.10 GB Master File Table (MFT): MFT size = 185.25 MB MFT record count = 189695 MFT usage = 100% Total MFT fragments = 2 Note: File fragments larger than 64MB are not included in the fragmentat ion statistics.
  12. Why would anyone want a Windows key finder unless they were trying to install an illegal copy of Windows? Because if they already had a legal copy of Windows, surely they would already have their Windows key on the documentation that came with their disk or on a label stuck to the side of their PC's? But even if there is a valid and legal reason for using it, Beta programs should always be used with caution because Beta programs are those that are still developed and tested for inconsistencies!
  13. If you save OE and/or Windows Mail emails to folders on your computer in the default .eml type, Outlook Express or Windows Mail fires up every time you want to read one of them. But if you save them as type .html from the save as drop-down box, they will then open much faster in Internet Explorer! However when saving and viewing them as type .html, neither the sender/recipients address nor the date will be saved or displayed - all you will see is the body of the email. This could be a good or a bad thing, depending on your reasons for keeping the email..... If you wish to retain the date and senders/recipients address, another option is to simply save them as type .txt from the drop-down box. Saving them as .txt you will be able to read the content but neither images nor links will be retained/displayed - instead just the txt version of the url will be displayed, which you can of course then copy and paste into your browser.
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